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Latest the Journal of Neuroscience Stories

7b2061bb3438127ef2e902b8969dfa561
2010-03-17 09:06:29

Knowing specific pattern of brain damage could help with diagnosis of affected children Children whose mothers abused methamphetamine (meth) during pregnancy show brain abnormalities that may be more severe than that of children exposed to alcohol prenatally, according to a study in the March 17 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. While researchers have long known that drug abuse during pregnancy can alter fetal brain development, this finding shows the potential impact of meth. Identifying...

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2010-03-03 10:06:20

Study suggests future portable prosthetic devices for movement-impaired Researchers have successfully reconstructed 3-D hand motions from brain signals recorded in a non-invasive way, according to a study in the March 3 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. This finding uses a technique that may open new doors for portable brain-computer interface systems. Such a non-invasive system could potentially operate a robotic arm or motorized wheelchair "” a huge advance for people with...

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2010-01-20 10:33:14

In new animal study, neurons developed from stem cells successfully wired with other brain regions Transplanted neurons grown from embryonic stem cells can fully integrate into the brains of young animals, according to new research in the Jan. 20 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Healthy brains have stable and precise connections between cells that are necessary for normal behavior. This new finding is the first to show that stem cells can be directed not only to become specific brain...

2009-09-16 07:16:55

Expert commentaries underscore need for public education and advocacy Two new expert commentaries released in the September 16 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience spotlight the increasingly violent animal rights attacks and the need for an educated public and engaged research community to ensure the safety of animals and researchers, as well as the continuation of health advances. The commentaries, written by Jeffery H. Kordower, and by Dario L. Ringach and J. David Jentsch, outline the...

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2009-08-19 13:30:00

Tone-deafness appears to be attributed to poor wiring between certain regions of the brain, researchers reported Wednesday. Writing in the August 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, Psyche Loui and colleagues said tone-deafness appears to be a neurological condition. "The anomaly suggests that tone-deafness may be a previously undetected neurological syndrome similar to other speech and language disorders, in which connections between perceptual and motor regions are impaired," said...

a53814b575c04f9a6807eaca3582302e
2009-05-06 08:10:50

Estrogen Found to Work Within Neurons to Facilitate Hearing and Memory Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered that the hormone estrogen plays a pivotal role in how the brain processes sounds. The findings, published in yesterday's issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, show for the first time that a sex hormone can directly affect auditory function, and point toward the possibility that estrogen controls other types of sensory processing as well. Understanding how estrogen...

2009-04-08 09:23:02

Mathematical value intuited without calculation; findings may impact math education Although fractions are thought to be a difficult mathematical concept to learn, the adult brain encodes them automatically without conscious thought, according to new research in the April 8 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The study shows that cells in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and the prefrontal cortex "” brain regions important for processing whole numbers "” are tuned to respond to...

adf3c287bb6a4e0118931ac6652a517b1
2009-02-26 09:20:28

It takes weeks or months for the effect of most antidepressants to kick in, time that can feel like an eternity to those who need the drugs the most. But new research suggests that a protein called p11, previously shown to play a role in a person's susceptibility to depression, activates a serotonin receptor in the brain known for producing a rapid antidepressant response. If scientists could develop drugs to target this receptor, they might produce an effect in as little as two days. The...

4d221bd9d05aff50ed4fa9885a0ea0bc1
2008-10-17 15:20:00

When French memoirist Marcel Proust dipped a pastry into his tea, the distinctive scent it produced suddenly opened the flood gates of his memory. In a series of experiments with sleeping mice, researchers at the Duke University Medical Center have shown that the part of the brain that processes scents is indeed a key part of forming long-term memories, especially involving other individuals. "We can all relate to the experience of walking into a room and smelling something that sparks a...

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2008-08-21 19:18:38

Findings may help explain how sleep-deprived people stay alert Just one night without sleep can increase the amount of the chemical dopamine in the human brain, according to new imaging research in the August 20 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Because drugs that increase dopamine, like amphetamines, promote wakefulness, the findings offer a potential mechanism explaining how the brain helps people stay awake despite the urge to sleep. However, the study also shows that the increase in...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.