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Latest The Million Women Study Stories

2012-05-01 09:38:12

Mammograms might benefit women in their 40s with family history or dense breasts Choosing when to start regular breast cancer screening is a complicated decision for individual women and their providers. For most women, increasing age is the biggest risk factor for breast cancer, which is much more common at age 60 than at 40. But two new articles on other risk factors may inform guidelines and clinical practice about screening mammography from age 40 to 49. The articles in the May 1...

2012-05-01 09:36:24

A new analysis suggests the benefits of mammography screening every other year outweigh the potential harms for women aged 40 to 49 who are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer -- a finding that could affect one out of every five American women. The researchers also found greater harms from screening done with digital mammography compared to film mammography. These findings, with contributions from three national research groups, are published in the May 1 issue of Annals of...

2012-04-04 09:29:30

A study in this week's PLoS Medicine suggests that increasing height and, among women who have never taken menopausal hormone therapy, increased body mass index are risk factors for developing ovarian cancer. These findings are important as in high income countries, the average height and average body mass index of women have increased by about 1 cm and 1 kg/m2 respectively per decade. These findings suggest that if all other factors that affect ovarian cancer risk had remained constant,...

2012-03-21 14:13:03

Results from one of the longest-running national breast cancer screening programs have shown that it has contributed to a drop in deaths from the disease, that any harm caused by the screening, such as false positives and over-diagnosis, has been limited, and that the costs have been reasonable. The Dutch population-based mammography breast cancer screening program began in 1989, and today (Wednesday) Mr Jacques Fracheboud, a senior researcher at the Erasmus University Medical Center...

2011-12-22 12:23:00

McMaster University researchers have found consistent evidence that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with breast cancer globally. This study comes at a time when more women are again asking for this medication to control hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause. The rising trend is at odds with a U.S. Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study of 2002 which found a higher incidence of breast cancer, heart attack and stroke among women using HRT. Those findings led to a...

2011-07-21 13:03:12

The American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Breast Imaging applaud and support updated American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG) recommendations that women begin getting annual mammograms at age 40. The updated ACOG recommendations now correspond with those of the American Cancer Society, ACR, Society of Breast Imaging (SBI), American Society of Breast Disease (ASBD) and many other major medical associations with demonstrated expertise in breast cancer care. Three...

2011-06-27 12:21:04

How much can a woman lower her risk of breast cancer by losing weight, drinking less, or exercising more? A study published online June 24 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute describes a new model to estimate the impact of these lifestyle changes on absolute breast cancer risk, suggesting risk reductions that could translate into a substantial number of prevented cancers across an entire population. Breast cancer risk models are widely used to estimate a woman's chances of...

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2011-06-05 08:51:04

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital announced Saturday they found that an estrogen-blocker known as Aromasin reduces the risk of developing breast cancer by 65 percent in post-menopausal women at high risk for breast cancer.In a late-stage trial of more than 4,500 post-menopausal women who were at increased risk of developing breast cancer, researchers found that those who took the drug, also known as exemestane, had fewer invasive breast cancers after 3 years and without severe...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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