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Latest Theories of dyslexia Stories

Study Finds Less Gray Matter In Brain Not The Blame For Dyslexia
2014-01-15 07:30:14

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Research has found a link between reading disabilities and less gray matter in the brain for people with dyslexia. However, new evidence from Georgetown University Medical Center's Center for the Study of Learning suggests that this is a consequence of poorer reading experiences and not the root cause of the disorder. Prior to this research, scientists assumed that the difference in the amount of gray matter might, in part, explain...

Study Finds As We Age, Our Reading Skills Tend To Change
2012-11-26 14:06:40

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online According to research published in the journal Psychology and Aging, word recognition patterns can change as we grow older. University of Leicester psychologists carried out a study into eye-movements of young and old people to examine reading styles in the different age groups. The team discovered for the first time that the way we read words changes the older we get. Researchers conducted experiments that used precise...

Dyslexia Roots Studied
2012-09-21 06:45:54

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Five percent. That´s the number of people who suffer from dyslexia worldwide, according to researchers at the College of Science at Northeastern University. Even with the number of people who suffer from the disorder, there still isn´t a clear reason as to what causes the disorder. With this in mind, a collaborative study was completed by researchers from Harvard Medical School, Western Galilee College, McGill...

2012-01-23 22:27:46

Brain MRIs may provide an early diagnostic marker Children at risk for dyslexia show differences in brain activity on MRI scans even before they begin learning to read, finds a study at Children's Hospital Boston. Since developmental dyslexia responds to early intervention, diagnosing children at risk before or during kindergarten could head off difficulties and frustration in school, the researchers say. Findings appear this week in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the...

2011-12-21 19:45:09

People with dyslexia often struggle with the ability to accurately decode and identify what they read. Although disrupted processing of speech sounds has been implicated in the underlying pathology of dyslexia, the basis of this disruption and how it interferes with reading comprehension has not been fully explained. Now, new research published by Cell Press in the December 22 issue of the journal Neuron finds that a specific abnormality in the processing of auditory signals accounts for the...

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2010-12-21 06:15:00

Advanced brain scans accurately predicted which teens with dyslexia would learn to read within three years, a result that could lead to better ways to treat the common learning disability, according to researchers on Monday. By searching for a specific pattern of brain activity in teens with dyslexia, the researchers were able to predict with 90 percent accuracy which students would learn to read. "This gives us hope that we can identify which children might get better over time," Dr....

2009-12-17 19:03:41

Contrary to popular belief, some very smart, accomplished people cannot read well. This unexpected difficulty in reading in relation to intelligence, education and professional status is called dyslexia, and researchers at Yale School of Medicine and University of California Davis, have presented new data that explain how otherwise bright and intelligent people struggle to read. The study, which will be published in the January 1, 2010 issue of the journal Psychological Science, provides a...

2009-06-25 09:08:11

Scottish medical scientists say they have discovered specific structural differences in the brains of people with distinct subtypes of dyslexia. The University of Edinburgh researchers say their findings are among the first to directly link brain structure with dyslexia subtype and symptom severity. Led by Cyril Pernet, the researchers compared magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brains of 38 people who had dyslexia with a typical brain constructed from the scans of 39 normal readers. The...

2009-06-25 07:45:20

Parts of the right hemisphere of the brains of people with dyslexia have been shown to differ from those of normal readers. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Neuroscience used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare the two groups, and were able to associate the neurological differences found with different language difficulties within the dyslexic group.Cyril Pernet, from the University of Edinburgh, worked with a team of researchers to compare the brains of 38 people...

2005-06-03 19:53:01

The dyslexic brain may have a general problem forming perceptual categories, including the templates for printed letters and speech sounds, say USC neuroscientists. This is reflected in a reduced ability to filter out visual "noise" that can obscure a pattern, the researchers suggest. Their novel hypothesis, published in the current issue of Nature Neuroscience, raises broader questions: Does the dyslexic brain's trouble with patterns and noise extend to other senses? Does poor filtering...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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