Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

Latest Therapies under investigation for multiple sclerosis Stories

2007-09-30 15:00:19

Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) announced today the publication of findings from a preclinical study reporting that the anti-LINGO-1 antibody can promote spinal cord remyelination and axonal integrity, suggesting a potential role as a treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). The results are published in the October issue of Nature Medicine, and confirm previously published data that suggested a role for the anti-LINGO-1...

2007-05-04 12:00:35

Teva Pharmaceuticals said a combination of Copaxone and antibiotic minocycline reduced brain lesions in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, compared to receiving Copaxone alone. New data from a randomized, double-blind study showed that a combination of Copaxone with the oral antibiotic minocycline reduced T1 Gadolinium enhancing lesions of the brain by 63% and reduced the number of new T2 lesions in patients by 65%. These results trended toward but did not reach...

2006-06-19 13:11:27

By Bill Berkrot NEW YORK (Reuters) - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd's multiple sclerosis (MS) drug Copaxone reduced relapses by 75 percent in both new patients and those who had not done well on the older Schering AG medicine Betaseron, according to a large study. The open label 805-patient study did not compare the two drugs but tested Copaxone in both new patients with relapsing-remitting MS and those who had taken Betaseron, but discontinued its use for a variety of reasons....

2006-06-05 16:35:00

By Susan Heavey WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. health officials cleared the way on Monday for multiple sclerosis drug Tysabri to return to the market with restrictions, following its withdrawal last year when it was linked to a rare but potentially fatal brain disease. Three patients taking the drug, made by Biogen Idec Inc. and distributed by Elan Corp., had developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Two of them died. Food and Drug Administration officials, who faced calls from...

2006-04-05 16:15:00

By Deena Beasley LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A high dose of Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.'s multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone is more effective at limiting relapses and brain lesions than the standard dose, without more side effects, researchers said on Wednesday. "For some people a higher dose may work better," said Dr. Jeffrey Cohen of the Cleveland Clinic's MS research center and lead investigator of a small nine-month trial comparing the two doses. The study, funded by Israel-based Teva,...

2004-11-27 12:00:07

WASHINGTON -- The government approved a drug Tuesday that tries a new method of attacking multiple sclerosis, an incurable disease of the central nervous system that affects 350,000 Americans. The drug -- a monoclonal antibody produced by Cambridge, Mass.- based Biogen Idec Inc. and Irish drug maker Elan Corp. -- is known chemically as natalizumab. During clinical trials, it was called Antegren, but in the Food and Drug Administration announcement, the name was changed to Tysabri....

2004-11-26 18:00:09

FRIDAY, Nov. 26 (HealthDayNews) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Tysabri (natalizumab) as a new treatment for multiple sclerosis. The incurable nervous system disease affects about 350,000 Americans. The drug, known as a humanized monoclonal antibody, appears to work by preventing immune cells from migrating from the bloodstream to the brain, where they cause inflammation and lead to nerve fiber damage, its two manufacturers said in a statement. The medication is...

2004-11-26 06:00:07

WASHINGTON -- The government approved a drug Tuesday that tries a new method of attacking multiple sclerosis, an incurable disease of the central nervous system that affects 350,000 Americans. The drug -- a monoclonal antibody produced by Cambridge, Mass.- based Biogen Idec Inc. and Irish drug maker Elan Corp. -- is known chemically as natalizumab. During clinical trials, it was called Antegren, but in the Food and Drug Administration announcement, the name was changed to Tysabri....