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Latest Thrombolysis Stories

2011-09-09 14:47:58

Considerable regional differences exist in the treatment of patients with acute cerebral infarction. This is the finding presented by Erwin Stolz and his co-authors in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2011; 108[36]: 607). The prognosis for patients with stroke largely depends on a rapid, standardized first response. Across the German federal state of Hesse, there are great differences in the time interval between symptom onset and...

2011-08-05 13:56:25

The percentage of graduating neurology residents comfortable treating stroke with a clot-busting drug has increased dramatically over the past 10 years, according to research published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. In a survey, the number of residents reporting feeling comfortable using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increased from 73 percent in 2000 to 94 percent in 2010. Furthermore, 95 percent in 2010 had used tPA compared to 80 percent in the earlier survey. Of...

2011-07-02 02:51:53

Education needed to close the gap, improve outcomes A citywide study published online in today's issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association demonstrates racial disparities in the use of clot-busting drugs to treat acute ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke. According to the study's results, significantly fewer black patients receive the drug tPA than whites because of delays in seeking emergency care and the presence of medical conditions that exclude them from...

2011-06-03 12:54:25

In a review of nationwide hospital databases, University of Cincinnati (UC) emergency medicine and neurology researchers have found that the rate of treatment with the standard therapy for acute ischemic stroke patients has doubled since 2005. Their paper, "Recombinant Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Use for Ischemic Stroke in the United States," is published online ahead of print in the journal Stroke. The study estimates between 23,800 and 36,000 U.S. patients received rtPA treatment in...

2011-06-03 12:34:55

American Heart Association rapid access journal report The use of clot-busting drugs to treat acute ischemic stroke increased from 2005 through 2009 "” but is still low, according to research reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Clot-busting drugs are known as thrombolytics, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only FDA-approved thrombolytic for treating acute ischemic stroke, which is caused by a blood clot in the brain. Although the study didn't...

2011-05-27 21:43:17

Treatment for stroke subset reduces mortality, improves quality of life A new treatment that treats a subset of stroke patients by combining minimally invasive surgery, an imaging technique likened to "GPS for the brain," and the clot-busting drug t-PA appears to be safe and effective, according to a multicenter clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins researchers. The novel treatment, detailed for the first time at this week's European Stroke Conference in Hamburg, Germany, was developed for...

2011-05-16 16:40:47

Although so-called clot-busting drugs are commonly used in the treatment of some patients with blood clots in the lungs, a new study conducted by researchers in Spain and the U.S. indicates the agents do not appear to be any more effective than traditional blood thinners for the majority of these patients. Clot-busters, or thrombolytic agents, also appear to increase the risk of death in patients with normal blood pressure. The study will be presented at the ATS 2011 International Conference...

2011-05-10 13:14:19

Approximately 14 percent of all strokes occur during sleep, preventing many from getting clot-busting treatment, according to a study published in the May 10, 2011, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "Because the only treatment for ischemic stroke must be given within a few hours after the first symptoms begin, people who wake up with stroke symptoms often can't receive the treatment since we can't determine when the symptoms...

2011-05-10 08:02:32

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Approximately 14 percent of all strokes occur during sleep, preventing many from getting clot-busting treatment, according to a study. "Because the only treatment for ischemic stroke must be given within a few hours after the first symptoms begin, people who wake up with stroke symptoms often can't receive the treatment since we can't determine when the symptoms started," study author Jason Mackey, M.D., of the University of Cincinnati and a member of the American...

2011-04-26 14:35:51

Cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins may help clot-busting drugs treat strokes, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The research involved 31 patients with ischemic stroke, a disorder when a clot blocks blood flow to part of the brain. In 12 patients who were already taking statins to control their cholesterol, blood flow returned to the blocked areas of the brain more completely and quickly. "We've known that patients on statins have...


Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'