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Non-Dominant Hand Vital To Evolution Of The Thumb

Non-Dominant Hand Vital To Evolution Of The Thumb

Gary Hughes, The University of Kent Research shows non-dominant hand is likely to have played a vital role in the evolution of modern human hand morphology. In the largest experiment ever undertaken into the manipulative pressures...

Latest Thumb Stories

supernumerary robotic fingers MIT
2014-07-20 05:32:27

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a wrist-mounted robotic device that could allow people to complete tasks like removing a bottle cap or twisting a screwdriver using a single hand. The unit has been called the “supernumerary robotic fingers” device and according to the developers, it enhances the human hand’s natural grasping motion. It is worn around the wrist and essentially...

2014-03-01 20:20:28

'Gatsby' Exception in Decline of Tobacco Use in PG-13 Movies SACRAMENTO, Calif., March 1, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- This year's Hackademy Award loser "The Great Gatsby" was too long for many and way too smoky for reviewers with the Thumbs Up! Thumbs Down! Program, but at least it was an exception during a year that otherwise saw tobacco use in youth-oriented movies at its lowest in recent memory. At least with PG-13 movies, teen reviewers with the Thumbs Up! Thumbs Down! Program found...

Bird Fingers: Understanding Evolution Of Wings In Our Avian Friends
2014-01-08 08:29:58

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While birds’ three fingers appear analogous to our own thumb, index and middle fingers, embryonic evidence has shown that the “pinky” side of a bird’s claw develops first, which some theories have said is evidence of the three bird fingers being an index, middle and ring finger. According to a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Zoology, as dinosaurs evolved into birds, they actually lost their pinky and thumb,...

Human Hands Evolved For Fighting And Punching
2012-12-20 10:48:00

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The human hand is unique in the animal kingdom. As we evolved from apes, it was one of the most distinctive features that truly distinguished us from our closest living relatives. But while we know our hands can allow us to do many things, such as play music, make art, and easily grasp and manipulate tools, they have actually evolved for a vastly different reason, according to new research. That research, conducted by the...

2011-09-05 11:21:00

Evolution adds and subtracts, and nowhere is this math more evident than in vertebrates, which are programmed to have five digits on each limb. But many species do not. Snakes, of course, have no digits, and birds have three. Yale scientists now have a good handle on how these developmental changes are orchestrated in the embryo, but there is still one outstanding debate on birds: Which digits are they: a thumb with index and middle fingers, or the index, middle and ring fingers? In...

96d75b52d7fdde4a57eb16dce76db9531
2010-01-18 15:35:00

A group of scientists may have solved the mystery of how human hands became nimble enough to make and manipulate stone tools, according to BBC News. The team wrote in the journal Evolution that changes in the shape of our feet effected the changes in our hands and fingers. According to their report, this shows that the capacity to stand and walk on two feet is intrinsically linked to the emergence of stone tool technology. The researchers used a mathematical model to simulate the changes....

2009-05-19 09:30:00

THE LINK: Uncovering Our Earliest Ancestor - Little, Brown and Company, May 20, 2009 NEW YORK, May 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Scientists have announced today the discovery of a 47-million-year-old human ancestor. Discovered in the Messel Pit, Germany, the fossil is twenty times older than most fossils that explain human evolution. Known as "Ida," the fossil is a transitional species, showing characteristics of the very primitive nonhuman evolutionary line (prosimians, such as lemurs), but even more...

fc6bc79ecd872337d0453d142a14c43e
2008-10-06 11:30:00

The latest breakthrough in a 120 year-old debate on the evolution of the bird wing was published in the open-access journal PLoS ONE, October 3, by Alexander Vargas and colleagues at Yale University, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. Bird wings only have three fingers, having evolved from remote ancestors that, like humans and most reptiles, had five fingers. Biologists have typically used embryology to identify the evolutionary origin (homology)...

2008-05-27 16:47:32

Seems everyone these days is giving the thumbs-up, no matter the circumstances. Senator Edward Kennedy gave a big thumbs-up as he left the hospital Wednesday, facing a new outlook on life with a potentially deadly brain tumor. Hillary did it just this week at a we're-not-mathematically-defeated-yet campaign rally in Florida. John McCain can't not do it. The gesture, for better or worse, has long breathed life or death into major events. Death to gladiators The...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'