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Latest Timekeeping Stories

Hiccup In Space-Time Continuum Brings Chaos To Internet
2012-07-02 11:01:29

John Neumann for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Did you find some of your favorite websites acting wonky this weekend? If so, you may want to blame the omniscient keepers of all knowledge for that. No, not the galaxy-sized blue-skinned creatures that keep the universe in balance, but the big brains at the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS), who monitor the gaps between atomic and planetary time and work to keep everything synced. As such, these...

2011-11-01 08:33:00

CHICAGO, Nov. 1, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Do you make the decisions in your company? If so, you can't miss this information. Does your supervisor make the decisions? If so, do yourself a favor and forward this article to them. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20111101/CG96204) The economy is hardly at its best and yet you must have noticed that your employees take longer coffee breaks, spend more time surfing the net for leisure or call friends in the...

2011-07-25 15:05:00

Sundial Powder Coating of Sun Valley, CA has been honored with a recognition by San Fernando Valley Business Journal in its selection of "Largest Manufacturing Companies" SUN VALLEY, Calif., July 22, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Announcing a special recognition appearing in the March 2011 issue of San Fernando Valley Business Journal published by San Fernando Valley Business Journal, Sundial Powder Coating was selected for the following honor: "Largest Manufacturing...

2008-12-24 16:47:08

This year will be longer than usual -- by one second, the U.S. Institute of Standards and Technology said Wednesday. The earth is sufficiently out of sync that a leap second has been scheduled for 7 p.m. U.S. Eastern Standard Time on Dec. 31, said the institute, noting those interested in watching it happen should go to www.time.gov before midnight, London time, and click on their time zone. A total of 24 leap seconds have been added since 1972, the last being in December 2005, because the...

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2008-12-09 09:50:00

The world's timekeepers are making the year 2008 even longer by adding a leap second to the last day of the year. The Earth is slowing down, which requires timekeepers to add an extra second to their atomic clocks to keep in sync with Earth's slightly slowing rotation.  So on December 31st at 6:59:59 p.m., an extra second will be added before 7:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. The extra second, plus the extra day on Feb. 29, makes the year 2008 the longest year since 1992. The decision to...

2008-07-16 12:01:29

By Kim Yeager, Star Tribune, Minneapolis Jul. 16--AMERICAN SWEDISH INSTITUTE MUSEUM GIFT SHOP Tabletop, Swedish iron from Dala Industrier, prints and design products and others, including Guldkroken ceramic candleholders, Danish va Solo carafes and juicer and Jobs table linens. Shown: Simply Scandinavia repro Gustavian Period cachepot, $98. DESIGN MODERN INTERIORS Several lines of home and home office furnishings in solid teak, steamed beech and oak including Salin, Ekornes and...

2005-12-24 15:55:00

By Jim Wolf WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Get ready for a minute with 61 seconds. Scientists are delaying the start of 2006 by the first "leap second" in seven years, a timing tweak meant to make up for changes in the Earth's rotation. The adjustment will be carried out by sticking an extra second into atomic clocks worldwide at the stroke of midnight Coordinated Universal Time, the widely adopted international standard, the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology said this week. "Enjoy...

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2005-12-24 15:55:00

By Jim Wolf WASHINGTON -- Get ready for a minute with 61 seconds. Scientists are delaying the start of 2006 by the first "leap second" in seven years, a timing tweak meant to make up for changes in the Earth's rotation. The adjustment will be carried out by sticking an extra second into atomic clocks worldwide at the stroke of midnight Coordinated Universal Time, the widely adopted international standard, the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology said this week. "Enjoy New...