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Latest Titanoboa Stories

Turtle Fossil Found In Colombia Is Round Like A Car Tire
2012-07-12 11:12:35

Paleontologist Carlos Jaramillo's group at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama and colleagues at North Carolina State University and the Florida Museum of Natural History discovered a new species of fossil turtle that lived 60 million years ago in what is now northwestern South America. The team's findings were published in the Journal of Paleontology. The new turtle species is named Puentemys mushaisaensis because it was found in La Puente pit in Cerrejón...

Image 1 - New Ancient Crocodile Named
2011-09-15 12:48:29

  Did an ancient crocodile relative give the world's largest snake a run for its money? In a new study appearing Sept. 15 in the journal Palaeontology, University of Florida researchers describe a new 20-foot extinct species discovered in the same Colombian coal mine with Titanoboa, the world's largest snake. The findings help scientists better understand the diversity of animals that occupied the oldest known rainforest ecosystem, which had higher temperatures than today, and could...

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2010-04-06 14:02:23

The discovery of a new fossil turtle species in Colombia's Cerrej³n coal mine by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama and the Florida Museum of Natural History helps to explain the origin of one of the most biodiverse groups of turtles in South America. Cerrejonemys wayuunaiki takes its genus name from Cerrej³n, and emys"”Greek for turtle. Its species name is the language spoken by the Wayuu people who live on the Guajira Peninsula in...

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2010-02-03 08:05:00

A 60-million-year-old relative of crocodiles described this week by University of Florida researchers in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology was likely a food source for Titanoboa, the largest snake the world has ever known. Working with scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, paleontologists from the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus found fossils of the new species of ancient crocodile in the Cerrejon Formation in northern Colombia. The...

2009-10-16 09:32:50

A team of researchers including a University of Florida paleontologist has used a rich cache of plant fossils discovered in Colombia to provide the first reliable evidence of how Neotropical rainforests looked 58 million years ago. Researchers from the Smithsonian Institution and UF, among others, found that many of the dominant plant families existing in today's Neotropical rainforests "” including legumes, palms, avocado and banana "” have maintained their ecological dominance...

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2009-10-13 07:25:22

Smithsonian researchers working in Colombia's Cerrej³n coal mine have unearthed the first megafossil evidence of a neotropical rainforest. Titanoboa, the world's biggest snake, lived in this forest 58 million years ago at temperatures 3-5 C warmer than in rainforests today, indicating that rainforests flourished during warm periods. "Modern neotropical rainforests, with their palms and spectacular flowering-plant diversity, seem to have come into existence in the Paleocene epoch, shortly...

2009-08-01 02:20:41

A California scientist disputes a theory that a giant snake that lived about 60 million years ago needed a warm climate to survive. Mark Denny, a professor of marine sciences at Stanford University, argued the 40-foot-long snake could have regulated its body temperature by coiling up, The Stanford University News reported Friday. Scientists at the University of Toronto discovered the fossil last year in an open-pit mine in Colombia. They estimate the length at 40 feet and weight at more than...

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2009-02-04 15:30:00

An international team of scientists announced Wednesday the discovery in northern Colombia of fossil remains of the largest snake ever known to have lived. The scientists named the 2,500 pound, 43 ft. long snake Titanoboa cerrejonensis ("ty-TAN-o-BO-ah sare-ah-HONE-en-siss"), meaning titanic boa from Cerrejon, the open-pit coal mine where the fossils were discovered. "This thing weighs more than a bison and is longer than a city bus," snake expert Jack Conrad of the American Museum of...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.