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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 7:25 EDT

Latest Titin Stories

2014-04-11 23:21:55

World Boxing Organization Welterweight Champion, Timothy Bradley has joined forces with TITIN™ to prepare for his highly anticipated rematch fight against Manny Pacquiao. Santa Clarita, CA (PRWEB) April 11, 2014 World Boxing Organization Welterweight Champion, Timothy Bradley has joined forces with TITIN™ to prepare for his highly anticipated rematch fight against Manny Pacquiao. The fight will take place at the infamous MGM Grand Hotel and Casino on Saturday, April 12, 2014 in Las...

2013-11-26 14:00:16

Rice U. researchers find misfolded proteins are capable of forming tree-like aggregates A method by Rice University researchers to model the way proteins fold – and sometimes misfold – has revealed branching behavior that may have implications for Alzheimer’s and other aggregation diseases. Results from the research will appear online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In an earlier study of the muscle protein titin, Rice chemist Peter Wolynes...

2012-04-02 15:21:15

Cardiomyopathy comprises a deterioration of the heart muscle that affects the organ's ability to efficiently pump blood through the body. Previously researchers have tied forms of the disease to the alternative splicing of titin, a giant protein that determines the structure and biomechanical properties of the heart, but the molecular mechanism remained unknown. Professor Michael Gotthardt and Professor Norbert Hübner of the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular...

2012-02-16 13:05:09

Gene alterations that shorten the body's largest protein could improve diagnosis, treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy, a familial heart disease For decades, researchers have sought a genetic explanation for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a weakening and enlargement of the heart that puts an estimated 1.6 million Americans at risk of heart failure each year. Because idiopathic DCM occurs as a familial disorder, researchers have long searched for genetic causes, but for most...

2012-02-15 10:59:42

The proteins actin, myosin and titin are big players in the business of muscle contraction. Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Hamburg, Germany, have now examined another muscle protein — myomesin — which they discovered can stretch up to two-and-a-half times its length, unfolding in a way that was previously unknown. The study is published 14 February in the open-access, online journal PLoS Biology. Myomesin links muscle filaments, which stretch...

2012-01-23 13:29:45

Research team with RUB involvement reports in Genes and Development The same mechanism that stabilizes the DNA in the cell nucleus is also important for the structure and function of vertebrate muscle cells. This has been established by RUB-researchers led by Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Linke (Institute of Physiology) in cooperation with American and German colleagues. An enzyme attaches a methyl group to the protein Hsp90, which then forms a complex with the muscle protein titin. When the...

2011-12-23 11:04:48

Circulation: active ingredient sildenafil makes stiffened cardiac walls elastic again How sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, can alleviate heart problems is reported by Bochum's researchers in cooperation with colleagues from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester (Minnesota) in the journal Circulation. They studied dogs with diastolic heart failure, a condition in which the heart chamber does not sufficiently fill with blood. The scientists showed that sildenafil makes stiffened cardiac...

2011-05-31 16:09:27

A large number of illnesses stem from misfolded proteins, molecules composed of amino acids. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now studied protein misfolding using a special spectroscopic technique. Misfolding, as they report in Nature, is more frequent if the sequence of the amino acids in the neighboring protein domains is very similar. Proteins are the main molecular machines in our bodies. They perform a wide range of functions, from digesting and processing nutrients,...

2009-07-21 13:47:35

A research collaboration between Munich-based biophysicists and a structural biologist in Hamburg is helping to explain why our muscles, and those of other animals, don't simply fall apart under stress. Their findings may have implications for fields as diverse as medical research and nanotechnology.The real strength of any skeletal muscle doesn't start with exercise; it comes ultimately from nanoscale biological building blocks. One key element is a bond involving titin, a giant among...