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Latest Tobias Riede Stories

Big Cat Roars Similar To Babies Crying
2011-11-03 05:10:16

When lions and tigers roar loudly and deeply — terrifying every creature within earshot — they are somewhat like human babies crying for attention, although their voices are much deeper. So says the senior author of a new study that shows lions' and tigers' loud, low-frequency roars are predetermined by physical properties of their vocal fold tissue — namely, the ability to stretch and shear — and not by nerve impulses from the brain. "Roaring is similar to what...

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2010-06-30 07:31:25

Wide range of pitch is due to vocal muscles more than air pressure Female zebra finches don't sing but make one-note, low-pitch calls. Males sing over a wide range of frequencies. University of Utah scientists discovered how: The males' stronger vocal muscles, not the pressure of air flowing through their lungs, lets them sing from the B note above middle C all the way to a whistle beyond the high end of a piano keyboard. "You have two variables "“ air pressure and muscle activity...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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