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Latest Tobias Riede Stories

Big Cat Roars Similar To Babies Crying
2011-11-03 05:10:16

When lions and tigers roar loudly and deeply — terrifying every creature within earshot — they are somewhat like human babies crying for attention, although their voices are much deeper. So says the senior author of a new study that shows lions' and tigers' loud, low-frequency roars are predetermined by physical properties of their vocal fold tissue — namely, the ability to stretch and shear — and not by nerve impulses from the brain. "Roaring is similar to what...

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2010-06-30 07:31:25

Wide range of pitch is due to vocal muscles more than air pressure Female zebra finches don't sing but make one-note, low-pitch calls. Males sing over a wide range of frequencies. University of Utah scientists discovered how: The males' stronger vocal muscles, not the pressure of air flowing through their lungs, lets them sing from the B note above middle C all the way to a whistle beyond the high end of a piano keyboard. "You have two variables "“ air pressure and muscle activity...