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Latest Toll-like receptor Stories

2010-03-03 14:14:17

Findings show that ancient 'enemies within' can mimic sepsis Inflammation is at the root of most serious complications occurring after both infection and injury. But while the molecular course of events that leads from microbial infections to the inflammatory condition called sepsis is fairly well understood, it is far less clear how and why physical injury can result in a similarly dangerous inflammatory response. Now a study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center...

2009-12-07 14:20:53

A pregnant woman's exposure to microbes may protect her child from developing allergies later in life. Researchers in Marburg, Germany find that exposure to environmental bacteria triggers a mild inflammatory response in pregnant mice that renders their offspring resistant to allergies. The study will be published online on December 7, 2009 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (www.jem.org). In an accompanying Commentary, Patrick Holt and Deborah Strickland discuss the biological...

2009-11-22 20:15:48

On the skin's surface, bacteria are abundant, diverse and constant, but inflammation is undesirable. Research at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine now shows that the normal bacteria living on the skin surface trigger a pathway that prevents excessive inflammation after injury. "These germs are actually good for us," said Richard L. Gallo, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and pediatrics, chief of UCSD's Division of Dermatology and the Dermatology section of the Veterans...

2009-11-06 12:41:36

When it comes to plants' innate immunity, like many of the dances of life, it takes two to tango. A receptor molecule in the plant pairs up with a specific molecule on the invading bacteria and, presto, the immune system swings into action to defend against the invasion of the disease-causing microbe. Unwrapping some of the mystery from how plants and bacteria communicate in this dance of immunity, scientists at the University of California, Davis, have identified the bacterial signaling...

2009-11-03 15:38:09

Researchers have new evidence to explain how saturated fatty acids, which soar in those who are obese, can lead the immune system to respond in ways that add up to chronic, low-grade inflammation. The new results could lead to treatments designed to curb that inflammatory state, and the insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes that come with it. One key, according to the report in the November Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication, is an immune receptor (called Toll-like receptor 4 or Tlr4)...

2009-05-06 09:35:51

Chronic inflammation, which is at the root of multiple diseases, links periodontal disease to increased incidence of cardiovascular disease.The activation of Toll-Like Receptors, which are essential components of the immune response to certain pathogens, promotes chronic inflammation in periodontal disease. Of these receptors TLR4 is one of a family of receptors that provides critical links between immune stimulants produced by microorganisms and the host response. It stands out because it...

2009-04-01 13:18:56

A U.S.-led international team of scientists found certain lung cells can be used in the human immune response for sensing airborne allergens. Researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Md., and Ghent University in Belgium said foreign substances, called antigens, are inhaled daily, however the lungs have mechanisms that usually prevent people from unwanted allergic immune responses to the materials. But sometimes immune responses are generated,...

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2009-02-05 15:36:22

Critical mechanism enables blood-borne immune cells to sense West Nile virus and to neutralize and clear infection in the brain In animal studies, researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Yale University have identified molecular interactions that govern the immune system's ability to defend the brain against West Nile virus, offering the possibility that drug therapies could be developed to improve success in treating West Nile and other viral forms of encephalitis, a brain...

2008-12-16 09:55:00

Research led by Johns Hopkins Children's Center scientists has figured out why a respiratory syncytial virus vaccine used in 1966 to inoculate children against the infection instead caused severe respiratory disease and effectively stopped efforts to make a better one. The findings, published online on Dec. 14 in Nature Medicine, could restart work on effective killed-virus vaccines not only for RSV but other respiratory viruses, researchers say. The new findings also debunk a popular theory...

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2008-10-28 10:05:00

Dutch researcher Joost Wiersinga from AMC Medical Centre in Amsterdam has unravelled a genetic defence mechanism against the lethal bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei. The research is the next step towards a vaccine against this bacterium suitable for bioweapons.Humans have an innate defence system against deadly bacteria. However, how the step from gene to anti-bacterial effect occurs in the body is not yet known. To date, B. Pseudomallei, a bacterium suitable for bioweapons, had managed to...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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