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Latest Tom Dillehay Stories

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2011-03-04 19:05:39

Archaeologists have uncovered caches of tools and animal remains from about 12,000 years ago on islands off the coast of California. The discovery shows fine tool technology and a rich maritime economy existed there. The tools vary markedly from mainland cultures of the era such as the Clovis. The finds suggest that early humans may have used coastal routes, rather than a land route, to South America. A team studying California's Channel Islands has found that the islands show evidence both...

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2010-12-02 08:45:00

Archaeological evidence shows that South Americans were chewing coca leaves at least 8,000 years ago, an international team of researchers has discovered. The researchers, who were led by Dr. Tom Dillehay of the Vanderbilt University Department of Anthropology, discovered and dated coca leaves beneath house floors in the Nanchoc Valley of Peru. Dillehay and colleague describe their findings in a paper, which appears in the latest edition of Antiquity, a quarterly journal of archaeology...

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2008-05-09 09:45:00

Earliest known human settlement in the Americas raises new questionsNew evidence, more questions. That's the thumbnail of the first new data reported in 10 years from Monte Verde, the earliest known human settlement in the Americas.Evidence from the archaeological site in southern Chile confirms Monte Verde is the Americas earliest known settlement and is consistent with the idea that early human migration occurred along the Pacific Coast more than 14,000 years ago, but questions remain about...

2006-01-04 07:33:51

LIMA, Peru -- In the Peru's Andean foothills, a group of archaeologists say they have found remnants of the oldest known irrigation canals in South America, which they hope will provide clues to the origin of the region's agriculturally based societies. "There are four sites in the area that have canals that date minimally 5,300 years ago, maybe a little earlier," team leader Tom D. Dillehay, an archaeologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, told The Associated Press....