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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 17:30 EDT

Latest Tom Iliffe Stories

2013-01-28 12:22:25

GALVESTON, Texas, Jan. 28, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A Texas A&M University at Galveston professor is part of a diving team that descended 462 feet in a West Texas cave, believed to be the deepest underwater cave in the United States. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120502/DC99584LOGO) Tom Iliffe, professor of marine biology and one of the world's most experienced cave diving scientists, led a diving team on a seven-day trip to explore, map and investigate the depths...

2012-01-26 13:23:25

Discoveries made in some underwater caves by Texas &M University at Galveston researchers in the Bahamas could provide clues about how ocean life formed on Earth millions of years ago, and perhaps give hints of what types of marine life could be found on distant planets and moons. Tom Iliffe, professor of marine biology at the Texas A&M-Galveston campus, and graduate student Brett Gonzalez of Trabuco Canyon, Calif., examined three "blue holes" in the Bahamas and found that layers...

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2009-09-01 11:10:00

Two tiny worms much smaller than a rice grain and a strange crustacean that has no eyes and poisonous fangs are among several new species of marine life discovered in an underwater cave by a Texas A&M University at Galveston researcher, who has had one of the new species named after him. Tom Iliffe, professor of marine biology and one of the world's foremost cave researchers, was part of an international team that discovered the new species in a mile-long underwater cave in...

2009-08-28 13:02:47

A crustacean with poisonous fangs and no eyes has been discovered in an underwater cave in the Canary Islands, researchers in Texas said. Tom Iliffe, a marine biologist at Texas A&M, Galveston, discovered the crustacean, and worms smaller than a grain of rice, in a mile-long underwater cave in Lanzarote, the university said in a release Friday. Iliffe, a renowned cave researcher, discovered the marine life while exploring the Tunnel de la Atlantida, the world's longest known underwater...

2009-08-28 09:27:51

Two tiny worms much smaller than a rice grain and a strange crustacean that has no eyes and poisonous fangs are among several new species of marine life discovered in an underwater cave by a Texas A&M University at Galveston researcher, who has had one of the new species named after him.Tom Iliffe, professor of marine biology and one of the world's foremost cave researchers, was part of an international team that discovered the new species in a mile-long underwater cave in Lanzarote,...

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2006-03-20 08:45:00

By Tim Gaynor TULUM, Mexico -- The ancient Maya once believed that Mexico's jungle sinkholes containing crystalline waters were the gateway to the underworld and the lair of a surly rain god who had to be appeased with human sacrifices. Now, the "cenotes," deep sinkholes in limestone that have pools at the bottom, are yielding scientific discoveries including possible life-saving cancer treatments. Divers are dipping into the cenotes, which stud the Yucatan peninsula, to explore a vast...

2006-03-20 08:20:00

By Tim Gaynor TULUM, Mexico (Reuters) - The ancient Maya once believed that Mexico's jungle sinkholes containing crystalline waters were the gateway to the underworld and the lair of a surly rain god who had to be appeased with human sacrifices. Now, the "cenotes," deep sinkholes in limestone that have pools at the bottom, are yielding scientific discoveries including possible life-saving cancer treatments. Divers are dipping into the cenotes, which stud the Yucatan peninsula, to explore a...