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Latest Tooth development Stories

Connecting Genes To Hominin Teeth Shows Evidence Of Natural Selection
2014-05-06 03:18:44

Duke University Along with our big brains and upright posture, thick tooth enamel is one of the features that distinguishes our genus, Homo, from our primate relatives and forebears. A new study, published May 5 in the Journal of Human Evolution, offers insight into how evolution shaped our teeth, one gene at a time. By comparing the human genome with those of five other primate species, a team of geneticists and evolutionary anthropologists at Duke University has identified two...

Urine Stem Cells Used To Grow Teeth In The Lab
2013-07-30 08:25:59

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of researchers from China's Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health have demonstrated human teeth can be generated by stem cells from a very interesting source: Urine. The Chinese team says they can also generate other solid organs and tissues from human waste. It's been observed before that stem cells are found in urine. Furthermore, when these stem cells are collected, scientists can coerce them to become induced...

Volcanic Grit Played Key Role In Strong Tooth Development
2013-03-05 19:55:56

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Archeologists have long assumed the evolutionary development of strong, thick-enameled teeth coincides with a mammals shift to a diet of field grasses. However, a new study in Nature Communications shows some Argentine mammals developed sturdy chompers in response to gritty volcanic dust that appeared in their tropical rainforest habitat. “The assumption about grasslands and the evolution of these teeth was based on...

2010-03-15 10:54:19

Each cusp of our teeth is regulated by genes which carefully control the development. A similar genetic puzzle also regulates the differentiation of our other organs and of all living organisms. A team of researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology of the University of Helsinki has developed a computer model reproducing population-level variation in complex structures like teeth and organs. The research takes a step towards the growing of correctly shaped teeth and other organs. The results...

2009-08-18 13:20:00

A group of researchers in Australia and Taiwan has developed a new way to analyze the health of human teeth using lasers. As described in the latest issue of Optics Express, the Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal, by measuring how the surface of a tooth responds to laser-generated ultrasound, they can evaluate the mineral content of tooth enamel -- the semi-translucent outer layer of a tooth that protects the underlying dentin.This is the first time anyone has been able to...

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2009-08-04 10:35:00

A Japanese study published on Monday showed that researchers have successfully implanted bioengineered seed-like tissue into the jaws of mice, growing new teeth for the rodents, AFP reported. Experts say the new technique could some day be used to replace other organs, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In the past, biologists have successfully cultivated limited tissue in a laboratory and successfully transplanted it into animals, but...

2009-02-26 13:37:00

Same Study Uncovers How Each Tooth Signals the Next to Start Growing ROCHESTER, N.Y., Feb. 26 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A system of opposing genetic forces determines why mammals develop a single row of teeth, while sharks sport several, according to a study published today in the journal Science. When completely understood, the genetic program described in the study may help guide efforts to re-grow missing teeth and prevent cleft palate, one of the most common birth defects. Gene...

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2009-02-26 15:25:00

Scientists have reported new insights gathered from a single gene that could one day be used to help adults grow a new set of teeth. Scientists from the University of Rochester bred mice that lacked the oddskipped related-2 (Osr2) gene. They noted that mice that lacked the gene grew an extra set of teeth next to their molars in similar fashion to sharks and other non-mammals. "It's exciting. We've got a clue what to do," Dr. Songtao Shi of the University of Southern California School of...

2009-02-10 10:50:58

A paper in this week's PLoS Biology reports that a common gene regulatory circuit controls the development of all dentitions, from the first teeth in the throats of jawless fishes that lived half a billion years ago, to the incisors and molars of modern vertebrates, including you and me. "It's likely that every tooth made throughout the evolution of vertebrates has used this core set of genes," said Gareth Fraser, postdoctoral fellow at Georgia Tech's School of Biology. The first vertebrates...

2007-07-03 09:17:00

By Liu, Jun Jin, Taocong; Chang, Syweren; Ritchie, Helena H; Et al Abstract We have recently reported the induction of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) into dentin-secreting odontoblast-like cells after stimulation by isolated dentin matrix components, thus mimicking the nature of tissue regeneration seen after tooth disease and injury. After confluency, the cells were further cultured for 21 d in the 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) (control), and in...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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