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Latest Toxicology Stories

2013-01-20 23:00:42

On January 9, 2013 the 10-month court injunction on Botox competitor Xeomin expired. Simon Ourian, M.D. of Epione Beverly Hills says that competition is good for the industry and consumers alike. Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) January 20, 2013 “I don´t see how this can be anything but a good thing for consumers,” opines Dr. Ourian, Medical Director of Epione Beverly Hills. “First there was Botox, then Dysport and now Xeomin, each with certain distinct attributes. This can...

2013-01-07 05:00:58

KWJ Engineering´s new CO card uses advanced printed gas sensors to enable a high performance handheld safety monitor that works with your cell phone. Newark, CA (PRWEB) January 06, 2013 KWJ Engineering´s new CO card uses advanced printed gas sensors to enable a high performance handheld safety monitor that works with your cell phone. The CO Card is a thin, portable, high-performance Carbon Monoxide monitor that has a touch screen interface, WiFi connectivity, and user programmable...


Latest Toxicology Reference Libraries

Ranitomeya sirensis
2013-07-30 10:53:54

Ranitomeya sirensis is a species of poison dart frog that is native to Peru. It is widely known as the Sira Poison Dart Frog, or more popularly as R. lamasi. It is kept as a bet by herpetoculturists and is considered to be one of the more difficult poison dart frogs to keep due to its relative rarity and the fragile nature of its tadpoles. Like most Ranitomeya species, R. sirensis is a mildly toxic poison dart frog. Its skin secretes small amounts of pumiliotoxins which coat the frog and...

Mimic Poison Frog, Ranitomeya imitator
2013-07-29 16:30:53

The Mimic Poison Frog (Ranitomeya imitator) is a type of poison dart frog located in the north-central region of eastern Peru. Like most other Ranitomeya species, R. imitator has a mild toxicity compared to other poison dart frogs. It produces the potent pumiliotoxin B, but its small size limits the amount of poison it can secrete. Like other poison dart frogs, it does not produce toxin in captivity. It most likely gains its poison from consuming toxic insects or other invertebrates within...

Blue Poison Dart Frog, Dendrobates Azureus
2013-06-25 14:59:59

The Blue Poison Dart Frog (Dendrobates azureus) is a species of poison dart frog located in the forests surrounded by the Sipaliwini savannah, which is found in southern Suriname and northern to central Brazil. This frog is widely known as the blue poison dart frog or by its Indian name, okopipi. The species name comes from the fact that it is colored azure. This medium sized frog weighs about eight grams. It grows between 3 and 4.5 centimeters long and has a typical lifespan of four to...

Harlequin Poison Frog, Oophaga Histrionica
2013-06-25 13:44:18

The Harlequin Poison Frog (Oophaga histrionica) known also as the Harlequin Poison Dart Frog, is a species of poison dart frog with a native range from Western Ecuador to the El Choco region of Colombia. The frog is usually found on the ground of tropical rain forests, amongst fallen limbs or leaf litter. O. histrionica, along with O. speciosa, produces cardiotoxins referred to as histrionicotoxins. These moderate to highly toxic compounds act as potent non-competitive antagonists of...

601px-Echinophilia
2012-04-03 19:33:28

Chalice Corals, are a family of stony corals in the Pectiniidae family. Members of this family are mostly colonial but at least one species, Echinomorpha nishihirai, is solitary. These corals are endemic to the Indian and Pacific oceans. Pectiniids have a number of different forms but are basically streamlined and smooth. Polyps are large and brightly colored and resemble those of members of the Mussidae family of corals. The polyps are only extended at night. Tentacles are translucent,...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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