Quantcast

Latest Toxicology Stories

2013-06-14 23:02:52

Dr. Simon Ourian of Epione Beverly Hills was asked in a recent issue of Life & Style magazine about a new Botox cream. According to Dr.

2013-06-11 23:26:35

The American College of Medical Toxicology has launched a national registry of patients with snakebite, with the goals of advancing our understanding of how venoms affect the human body and improving

2013-05-24 23:24:33

A recent study from Stony Brook University examines the presence and effects of gold nanoparticles that are found in everyday items, most notably cosmetics. Dr.

Synthetic Spider Protein Future Of Anti Venoms
2013-05-10 08:51:22

Scientists say they have engineered a spider protein that could be the start of a new generation of anti-venom vaccines, with the potential to save thousands of lives worldwide.

Study Says Lipstick Contains Toxic Levels Of Metals
2013-05-02 13:00:12

A new study from University of California, Berkeley has found dangerous levels of lead, chromium and other toxic metals in a number of commonly sold lipsticks.

2013-04-30 23:03:16

The American College of Medical Toxicology launches ‘Ask A Toxicologist’ on its website.


Latest Toxicology Reference Libraries

Golfodulcean Poison Frog, Phyllobates Vittatus
2014-09-12 08:59:50

The Golfodulcean Poison Frog, Phyllobates Vittatus, is a species of frog belonging to the Dendrobatidae family that is native to Costa Rica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical, moist, lowland forests and rivers. It’s threatened by habitat loss. Like all members of the genus Phyllobates, Golfodulcean Poison Frogs have highly potent neurotoxin alkaloid poisons in their skin. While it’s only the fourth most toxic of the genus, the Golfodulcean Poison Frog is still a highly...

Golden Poison Frog, Phyllobates Terribilis
2014-09-12 08:44:46

The Golden Poison Frog, Phyllobates Terribilis, known also as the Golden Frog, Golden Poison Arrow Frog or the Golden Dart Frog, is a poison dart frog that is native to the Pacific coast of Colombia. The optimal habitat of this frog is the rainforest with high rain rates, altitudes between 100 and 200 meters, temperatures of at least 26 degrees Celsius, and relative humidity of 80 to 90 percent. While in the wild, this is a social animal, living in groups of up to six individuals; however,...

Ranitomeya sirensis
2013-07-30 10:53:54

Ranitomeya sirensis is a species of poison dart frog that is native to Peru. It is widely known as the Sira Poison Dart Frog, or more popularly as R. lamasi. It is kept as a bet by herpetoculturists and is considered to be one of the more difficult poison dart frogs to keep due to its relative rarity and the fragile nature of its tadpoles. Like most Ranitomeya species, R. sirensis is a mildly toxic poison dart frog. Its skin secretes small amounts of pumiliotoxins which coat the frog and...

Mimic Poison Frog, Ranitomeya imitator
2013-07-29 16:30:53

The Mimic Poison Frog (Ranitomeya imitator) is a type of poison dart frog located in the north-central region of eastern Peru. Like most other Ranitomeya species, R. imitator has a mild toxicity compared to other poison dart frogs. It produces the potent pumiliotoxin B, but its small size limits the amount of poison it can secrete. Like other poison dart frogs, it does not produce toxin in captivity. It most likely gains its poison from consuming toxic insects or other invertebrates within...

Blue Poison Dart Frog, Dendrobates Azureus
2013-06-25 14:59:59

The Blue Poison Dart Frog (Dendrobates azureus) is a species of poison dart frog located in the forests surrounded by the Sipaliwini savannah, which is found in southern Suriname and northern to central Brazil. This frog is widely known as the blue poison dart frog or by its Indian name, okopipi. The species name comes from the fact that it is colored azure. This medium sized frog weighs about eight grams. It grows between 3 and 4.5 centimeters long and has a typical lifespan of four to...

More Articles (11 articles) »
Word of the Day
saggar
  • A ceramic container used inside a fuel-fired kiln to protect pots from the flame.
The word 'saggar' may come from 'safeguard'.
Related