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Latest Toxins Stories

2011-09-12 14:29:22

Professor Rikard Blunck receives the Society of General Physiologists' Cranefield Award for his breakthrough Toxin proteins are genetically engineered into our food because they kill insects by perforating body cell walls, and Professor Rikard Blunck of the University of Montreal's Group for the study of membrane proteins (GÉPROM) has detected the molecular mechanism involved. In recognition of his breakthrough, he received the Traditional Paul F. Cranefield Award of the...

2011-08-26 13:05:20

Babies and toddlers with congenital heart disease are at an increased risk of having harmful toxins in their blood, particularly following surgery, according to research by a team at Imperial College London. The study, published today in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, found that children with high levels of toxins from gut bacteria in their blood are likely to take longer to recover from surgery and spend more time in intensive care. The researchers say...

2011-08-11 14:24:00

HAYWARD, Calif., Aug. 11, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- While media worldwide report almost on a weekly basis about new outbreaks of food-borne bacterial epidemics, a new USDA study finds that olive polyphenols can inactivate one of the bacteria--and its toxins--at the center of many of today's most deadly food poisoning occurrences. In a ground-breaking research conducted at the Albany, California, Western Regional Center, a group of USDA researchers led by chief scientist Mendel Friedman has...

2011-07-22 14:32:43

This study paves the way for developing toxin antidotes to safeguard public health and national security.  A team of scientists from A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) has discovered the secret recipe for "Ëœantidotes' that could neutralize the deadly plant toxin Ricin, widely feared for its bioterrorism potential, as well as the Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE) responsible for the tens of thousands of hospital-acquired infections in immune-compromised patients...

2011-07-22 01:40:23

Toxins produced by plants and bacteria pose a significant threat to humans, as emphasized by the recent effects of cucumber-borne Shiga toxin in Germany. Now, new research published on July 21st by the Cell Press journal Developmental Cell provides a clearer view of the combination of similar and divergent strategies that different toxins use to invade a human host cell. Ricin is a highly toxic protein derived from the castor bean plant that has raised concerns as a potentially lethal...

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2011-07-19 09:44:15

Marsupials that prey on venomous snakes also evolve rapidly Research published recently in PLoS One delivers new insight about rapid toxin evolution in venomous snakes: pitvipers such as rattlesnakes may be engaged in an arms race with opossums, a group of snake-eating American marsupials. Although some mammals have long been known to eat venomous snakes, this fact has not been factored into previous explanations for the rapid evolution of snake venom. Instead, snake venom is usually seen as...

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2011-06-27 05:45:00

Researchers in Australia have found that a chemical compound typically used on heart patients may raise chances of survival for snakebite victims. The study, published in Nature Medicine, claims chemical nitric oxide can slow down, by as much as 50 percent, the time it takes for snake venom to enter the bloodstream allowing time for victims to seek medical help, said lead author Dirk van Helden, professor at the School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle in Australia. Reuters...

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2011-05-20 09:20:58

Liquid crystal droplets could replace horseshoe crab blood in common endotoxin test The Food and Drug Administration requires every drug they certify to be tested for certain poisons that damage patient health. The current gold standard for this is the limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay that involves using the blood of horseshoe crabs, which strangely enough is blue, to test for endotoxin, a substance commonly associated with many symptoms caused by bacterial infections. But researchers at...

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2011-05-17 07:34:24

The biophysics of snakebites For years Professor Leo von Hemmen, a biophysicist at the TU Muenchen, and Professor Bruce Young, a biologist at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, have been researching the sense of hearing in snakes. While discussing the toxicity of their snakes, it dawned on them that only few snakes inject their venom into their victims' bodies using hollow poison fangs. Yet, even though the vast majority of poisonous reptiles lack hollow fangs, they are effective...

2011-04-28 00:20:02

Fables have long cast scorpions as bad-natured killers of hapless turtles that naively agree to ferry them across rivers. Michigan State University scientists, however, see them in a different light. Ke Dong, MSU insect toxicologist and neurobiologist, studied the effects of scorpion venom with the hopes of finding new ways to protect plants from bugs. The results, which are published in the current issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, have revealed new ways in which the venom...


Latest Toxins Reference Libraries

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2007-01-10 10:29:11

The Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox, is a species of venomous rattlesnake found in the United States and Mexico. It is found in California, Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. It prefers flatlands and prairies to the rocky hills and low mountains. This snake is generally colored dark or light brown. Its pattern is a unique row of large, dark diamond shapes edged in yellow trim, running down the length of its body. The diamonds fade to dark rings around the tail, where...

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2005-06-15 17:02:02

Rattlesnakes are a group of venomous New World snakes (genera Crotalus and Sistrurus) which have a small jointed rattle on their tails. They use this rattle as a warning device when they feel threatened. The rattle is composed of a series of nested, hollow beads which are actually modified scales from the tail-tip. Each time the snake sheds its skin, a new rattle segment is added. Since they may shed their skins many times a year (depending on food supply and consequent growth rates), and...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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