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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 17:30 EDT

Latest Tracy Bedrosian Stories

Red Lights At Night Better Than White When It Comes To Mood
2013-08-07 11:32:35

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online People working the graveyard shift may want to literally see red because according to a new study -- the color of light animals are exposed to at night can affect mood regulation. Study researchers from The Ohio State University found hamsters that were exposed to blue lights at night experienced the worst mood disruptions, followed closely by white lights, when compared to hamsters that spent their nights in a dim red light. "Our...

2012-07-24 11:14:33

Chronic exposure to dim light at night can lead to depressive symptoms in rodents -- but these negative effects can be reversed simply by returning to a standard light-dark cycle, a new study suggests. While hamsters exposed to light at night for four weeks showed evidence of depressive symptoms, those symptoms essentially disappeared after about two weeks if they returned to normal lighting conditions. Even changes in the brain that occurred after hamsters lived with chronic light at...

2011-06-30 07:03:15

By Lydia Jennings, Ivanhoe Health Correspondent (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A new experiment could help explain sundown syndrome in older adults, especially those with dementia. The exact cause of sundown syndrome is not known, however new research provides evidence that late-day anxiety and agitation has a biological basis in the brain. Found in 80 to 90 year old people, "sundowning" shows high levels of anxiety, agitation, general activity and delirium in the late afternoon and evening, leading...

2011-06-27 23:28:24

New research provides the best evidence to date that the late-day anxiety and agitation sometimes seen in older institutionalized adults, especially those with dementia, has a biological basis in the brain. The findings could help explain "sundowning," a syndrome in which older adults show high levels of anxiety, agitation, general activity and delirium in late afternoon and evening, before they would normally go to bed. "It's a big problem for caregivers. Patients can get aggressive and very...

2010-11-18 12:38:27

Exposure to even dim light at night is enough to cause physical changes in the brains of hamsters that may be associated with depression, a new study shows. Researchers found that female Siberian hamsters exposed to dim light every night for eight weeks showed significant changes in a part of the brain called the hippocampus. This is the first time researchers have found that light at night, by itself, may be linked to changes in the hippocampus. These alterations may be a key reason why the...