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Latest Traditional Chinese medicine Stories

2013-04-27 23:02:18

Driven by government support and increasing demand from patients, the development of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) hospitals in China has accelerated in recent years.

2013-04-23 23:20:44

New group acupuncture clinic offered by MIA Acupuncture spurs efforts to boost treatment impact significantly by offering affordable alternative medicine sessions.

2013-03-13 15:42:56

Scientists are reporting an advance toward overcoming a major barrier to tapping the potential of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and India's Ayurvedic medicine in developing new and more effective modern drugs.

2013-03-02 23:03:07

Bel Marra Health, who offers high-quality, specially formulated vitamins and nutritional supplements, is reporting on a new research that shows how acupuncture is being studied as an effective

2013-02-27 23:01:02

Shaolin Temple Grand Master Shi DeRu’s Annual Qi Retreat with the theme of “Healing-Awakening & Enlightening the Body’s Internal Defense System”, gets rave reviews from its enthusiastic

2013-02-21 23:02:31

People who don’t know how to cleanse their liver gallbladder and are concerned about this organ’s intoxication related issues have many reasons to thank the website BalancedHealthToday.com.


Latest Traditional Chinese medicine Reference Libraries

28_5196185b93f0869f4e8d01247f9ca337
2005-05-26 11:26:21

Cinnabar (German Zinnober), sometimes written cinnabarite, is a name applied to red mercury(II) sulfide (HgS), or native vermilion, the common ore of mercury. The name comes from the Greek, used by Theophrastus, and was probably applied to several distinct substances. Other sources say the word comes from the Persian zinjifrah, originally meaning "lost". Cinnabar was mined by the Roman Empire for its mercury content and it has been the main ore of mercury throughout the centuries. Some...

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Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.