Quantcast

Latest transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation Stories

2012-07-06 23:03:09

Some of the outstanding products from Better Life Devices include the WinStim Therapeutic Ultrasound Device which can be used to apply therapeutic deep heat for the treatment of chronic and sub-chronic

2012-05-17 12:28:11

Stories of athletes bravely "playing through the pain" are relatively common and support the widespread belief that they experience pain differently than non-athletes.

2012-05-14 22:35:21

For people receiving health care for acute and persistent low-back pain, symptoms will improve significantly in the first six weeks, but pain and disability may linger even after one year.

2012-05-01 11:00:05

Migraine pain sits at the upper end of the typical pain scale – an angry-red section often labeled “severe.”

2012-03-17 23:00:57

PMI has been manufacturing a full line of electrotherapy related products for over 19 years, and they are one of the largest electrotherapy electrode manufacturers in the USA today.

Study Finds Women Experience More Intense Pain Then Men
2012-01-23 13:10:13

When suffering from the same medical conditions, on average, women claim to experience more intense pain than men, according to a new study published online in The Journal of Pain on Monday.


Latest transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation Reference Libraries

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy
2013-03-04 16:24:04

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) is the noninvasive treatment of kidney stones, stones in the gallbladder as well as calcium build ups in the liver using acoustic pulses. Procedure A lithotriptor breaks up the calcium stones without damage being done to the patient through the use of high-intensity, externally-applied, focused acoustic pulses. By laying the patient down on their back and placing a water-filled coupling device under the back at the level of the kidneys, the...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
begunk
  • To befool; deceive; balk; jilt.
  • An illusion; a trick; a cheat.
The word 'begunk' may come from a nasalised variant of Scots begeck ("to deceive, disappoint"), equivalent to be- +‎ geck.