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Latest Transitional fossil Stories

505 Million Year Old Fossil Linked To Humans
2012-03-06 14:15:10

A team of researchers have discovered that a 505 million-year-old fossil is actually an ancient relative to humans. Researchers from the University of Cambridge, University of Toronto and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) confirmed that the extinct Pikaia gracilen found in Burgess Shale fossil beds in Canada's Yoho National Park is the most primitive form of all known vertebrates, including humans. Pikaia was first described by American paleontologist Charles Doolittle Walcott in 1911 as a...

New Research Shows Feathered Dinosaur Could Fly
2012-01-25 06:22:05

[ Watch the Video ] An international team of researchers led by Brown University has shed some new light on whether the winged dinosaur Archaeopteryx could fly. The team has determined that a well-preserved feather on the raven-sized dinosaur's wing was black, which is evidence that the feathers had traits that could help Archaeopteryx fly. Also, the researchers determined that the fossilized feather's structure is identical to living birds, according to the research published in the...

2011-12-28 07:46:39

University of Oregon scientist finds evidence that the transition occurred in humid, wooded floodplains A small fish crawling on stumpy limbs from a shrinking desert pond is an icon of can-do spirit, emblematic of a leading theory for the evolutionary transition between fish and amphibians. This theorized image of such a drastic adaptation to changing environmental conditions, however, may, itself, be evolving into a new picture. University of Oregon scientist Gregory J. Retallack,...

African Lungfish Research Hints At New Evolutionary Step
2011-12-13 13:44:14

Researchers have revealed that the African lungfish can use its thin pelvic limbs to propel itself forward. The team's discovery reshuffles the order of evolutionary events leading up to creatures being able to walk, and also suggests that fossil tracks long thought to be the work of early tetrapods could have been produced instead by lobe-finned ancestors of the lungfish. "In a number of these trackways, the animals alternate their limbs, which suggested that they must have been made...

2011-10-27 07:00:00

The Biology Magazine Eurekamag.com publishes reviews on a wide range of topics within the biological sciences. The magazine publishes 1-4 such reviews every day and the latest inclusions cover the "handy man" Homo habilis and gender discrimination aka Sexism. (PRWEB) October 27, 2011 The Science Magazine EurekaMag.com covers a wide range of topics including biology, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, geography, environment and health. Drawing from this pool of scientific disciplines, it...

Image 1 - Researchers Find New Species Of Ancient Predatory Fish
2011-09-12 11:14:53

  The Academy of Natural Sciences today announced the discovery of a new species of large predatory fish that prowled ancient North American waterways during the Devonian Period, before backboned animals existed on land. Drs. Edward "Ted" Daeschler and Jason Downs of the Academy and colleagues from the University of Chicago and Harvard University describe the new denizen of the Devonian they named Laccognathus embryi in the current issue of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology....

Image 1 - New Evolutionary Link Between Australopiths And Humans
2011-09-09 10:51:52

  [ View Video] New analysis of two-million-year-old hominid bones found in South Africa provide the clearest evidence of evolution´s first major step toward modern humans, evidence that is leading some experts to believe the findings will change longstanding views on the origins of humans. The well-preserved bones, from Australopithecus sediba, are from a part-human, part-ape species that have never been seen before now. The hands are similar to man, it has sophisticated...

science-082411-002
2011-08-24 16:42:48

  According to a new study, the first ancestor of modern humans to master the art of cooking was homo erectus. Harvard University researchers said that the ability to cook and process food allowed homo erectus, the Neanderthals and homo sapiens to make huge evolutionary leaps that differentiated them from chimpanzees and other primates. The scientists back-up claims by previous studies that suggest homo erectus may have known how to cook.  They based their results on an...

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2011-02-11 06:25:00

A fossilized arched foot bone recovered from Ethiopia shows that our human ancestors walked upright 3.2 million years ago, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science. The fossil, a fourth metatarsal, or midfoot bone, belongs to a group of the famed hominid Lucy, and indicates that a permanently arched foot was present in the species Australopithecus afarensis.  The findings are the first evidence to address the question of how this species moved around. "This fourth...

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2011-02-08 08:20:00

A new form of X-ray imaging technology and a nearly 100 million year old fossil have helped researchers gain a better understanding of how snakes lost their legs through evolution, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. In the study, Alexandra Houssaye from the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle (MNHN) in Paris and colleagues used synchrotron X-ray machines at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to create 3D images of a 95 million...


Latest Transitional fossil Reference Libraries

42_6e9e514e1334f1d4f015f1cc3dc3896d
2007-12-21 13:22:00

Hyracotherium (Hyracotherium leporine), was once considered to be the earliest known member of the horse family. Now, though, it is considered to be part of the perissodactyl family related to both horses and brontotheres. Hyracotherium was a dog-sized perissodactyl ungulate that lived in the Northern Hemisphere, with species ranging throughout Asia, Europe, and North America during the Early to Mid Eocene, about 60 to 45 million years ago. The first fossils of this animal were found in...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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