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Latest Transitional fossil Stories

d9225007bbea1c1897d0c145a3e00a251
2010-12-17 10:25:55

There's a whale of a new display at the University of Michigan Exhibit Museum of Natural History, a leviathan that represents a scientific saga of equally grand proportions. A complete, 50-foot-long skeleton of the extinct whale Basilosaurus isis, which lived 37 million years ago, now is suspended from the ceiling of the museum's second floor gallery and will reign over an updated whale evolution exhibit scheduled to open in April 2011. "It's a spectacular fossil," said Exhibit Museum...

2010-12-07 00:00:41

HMNS Field Expedition will Excavate Extremely Rare, Nearly Complete Dimetrodon Fossil Join Famous Paleontologist and Team to See Fossil Emerge First-Hand Houston, TX (Vocus) December 6, 2010 The Houston Museum of Natural Science Paleontology team has discovered an articulated specimen of a Dimetrodon on the Craddock Ranch in Baylor County. Join the team and Dr. Robert T. Bakker, renowned paleontologist and HMNS curator of paleontology, for a special expedition to Seymour, Texas as they...

b3a3d1b1c2637100d4efa65132fba7c01
2010-11-03 10:00:00

Human ancestors from over four million years ago were quite promiscuous, with monogamous relationships developing as hominins evolved over time, claims a new study published in the British scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The research, which was led by Emma Nelson of the University of Liverpool's School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, involved the study of the fossilized fingers of Neanderthals and ancient apes, as well as the species Ardipithecus ramidus and...

68ceb0b3b1cf95f1fe3d6f244e5551cd1
2010-06-22 07:05:00

Within the coarsening base of an ancient mudstone exposure in the Afar Region of Ethiopia, researchers say they found evidence that provides new information about the best-known early human ancestor, Australopithecus afarensis. Yohannes Haile-Selassie--curator and head of physical anthropology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History--and an international team of scientists dug up a 3.6 million-year-old partial skeleton of the same species as the famed hominid "Lucy." It's only the second...

2010-06-21 14:00:00

Early Hominid Skeleton Confirms Human-Like Walking is Ancient CLEVELAND, June 21 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Meet "Lucy's" great-grandfather. Scientists from The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Kent State University, Case Western Reserve University, Addis Ababa University and Berkeley Geochronology Center were part of an international team that discovered and analyzed a 3.6 million-year-old partial skeleton found in Ethiopia. The early hominid is 400,000 years older than the famous...

aa7200aad0e9813c913ee91d660a1a881
2010-05-28 06:45:00

Human evolution had some excitement last fall when a fossil skeleton named "Ardi" was discovered. Now, scientists are having doubts about what exactly the creature was and what kind of landscape it had inhabited. New findings are leading experts to question whether Ardi really belongs on the human branch of the evolutionary tree, and whether it really lived in woodlands. Another question being raised has implications for theories about what kind of environment spurred early human evolution....

0a72c9d3089353047a40e6ddb3144ac31
2010-05-18 07:23:07

Event of unknown origin occurred as first vertebrates tested land A mass extinction of fish 360 million years ago hit the reset button on Earth's life, setting the stage for modern vertebrate biodiversity. The mass extinction scrambled the species pool near the time at which the first vertebrates crawled from water towards land. Those few species that survived the bottleneck were the evolutionary starting point for all vertebrates--including humans--that exist today, according to results of a...

c63ff14754b453c6ce001df5d567676a1
2010-01-07 06:50:00

Fossilized footprints of a mysterious, long-extinct creature in a Polish quarry have caused paleontologists to reconsider traditional thinking of how sea-based vertebrates moved to land. Until now, scientists have thought they understood the evolutionary transition from fin to foot fairly well. One of the key theories in evolutionary biology is that tetrapods, four-legged animals with a spine, came from fish that had pairs of lobed fins. Fish called elpistostegids were the intermediate stage...

3b56f1cff10b7bb100e8a92bdf3f922e1
2009-12-17 13:47:38

Ardipithecus ramidus, or "Ardi," receives the top honor as the Breakthrough of the Year, named by Science and its publisher, AAAS, the world's largest science society. The Dec. 18 issue of Science takes a look back at the big science stories over the past 12 months and presents its selections for the 10 major scientific breakthroughs of 2009. "Ardi," a hominid species that lived 4.4 million years ago, was unveiled on Oct. 1 by Kent State University Professor of Anthropology Dr. C. Owen...

2009-10-12 12:27:00

DENVER, Oct. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- The discovery of the oldest-known fossil skeleton of a human ancestor (dubbed "Ardi") has generated enormous buzz in the scientific community and news media. A new documentary airing on the Discovery Channel, entitled Discovering Ardi, unveils this historic finding to the world thanks to computer animations created by Impossible, a leading design and visual effects studio. (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20091012/LA90890) According to...


Latest Transitional fossil Reference Libraries

42_6e9e514e1334f1d4f015f1cc3dc3896d
2007-12-21 13:22:00

Hyracotherium (Hyracotherium leporine), was once considered to be the earliest known member of the horse family. Now, though, it is considered to be part of the perissodactyl family related to both horses and brontotheres. Hyracotherium was a dog-sized perissodactyl ungulate that lived in the Northern Hemisphere, with species ranging throughout Asia, Europe, and North America during the Early to Mid Eocene, about 60 to 45 million years ago. The first fossils of this animal were found in...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'