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Latest Transitional fossil Stories

a6d76825dcca314897a5733b7c855708
2009-10-09 12:25:00

Experts say new research reveals that the Archaeopteryx, which has long been viewed as the archetypal first bird, was actually a lot less "bird-like" than scientists originally thought. Archaeopteryx (from the Greek for "ancient wing"), lived 150 million years ago during the Late Jurassic period in what is now Germany. New microscopic images of the ancient cells and blood vessels inside the bones of the winged, feathered, claw-handed creature show unexpectedly slow growth and maturation that...

4606a439f2bb3eb6e2b0d2fd081d44c8
2009-10-09 08:00:00

Among the many surprises associated with the discovery of the oldest known, nearly complete skeleton of a hominid is the finding that this species took its first steps toward bipedalism not on the open, grassy savanna, as generations of scientists "“ going back to Charles Darwin "“ hypothesized, but in a wooded landscape. "This species was not a savanna species like Darwin proposed," said University of Illinois anthropology professor Stanley Ambrose, a co-author of two of 11...

c3b3cc0f7bc30cb03f623f316821223b
2009-10-01 12:54:34

A U.S. biological anthropologist says he's determined humans did not evolve from apes, but, rather, apes evolved from humans. Kent State University Professor C. Owen Lovejoy, who specializes in the study of human origins, said his findings came from a study of Ardipithecus ramidus, a hominid species that lived 4.4 million years ago in what now is Ethiopia. People often think we evolved from apes, but no, apes in many ways evolved from us, Lovejoy said. It has been a popular idea to think...

28099fcb362571294380324d11dd14b6
2009-10-01 14:55:00

A 17-year investigation into the discovery of the fragile remains of a small "ground ape" discovered in Ethiopia is described today in a special issue of the journal Science. The report includes 11 papers about the discovery of the Ardipithecus fossils, which include a partial skeleton of a female nicknamed "Ardi", the earliest known skeleton from the human branch of the primate family tree.  The branch includes Homo sapiens as well as species closer to humans than to chimpanzees and...

2009-10-01 09:49:00

KENT, Ohio Oct. 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Throw out all those posters and books that depict an ape evolving into a human being, says Kent State University Professor of Anthropology Dr. C. Owen Lovejoy. An internationally recognized biological anthropologist who specializes in the study of human origins, Lovejoy is one of the primary authors who revealed their research findings today on Ardipithecus ramidus, a hominid species that lived 4.4 million years ago in what is now Ethiopia....

d2618a211d70637ccc4ae78d8fb45e5e1
2009-07-07 06:45:00

Nearly everyone can recall the high school textbook illustrations of the planet's first land-dwelling creatures, ubiquitously represented as comic-looking fish with short, stumpy legs.  A team of paleontologists, however, are challenging these standard depictions, saying that the earth's first tetrapods were for more diverse than previously suspected. "Some looked like crocodiles, some looked like little lizards, some like moray eels, and some were snake-like," explained Jennifer Clack...

2009-06-02 10:42:24

Researchers from the Institut Català de Paleontologia (ICP), from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, directed by professor Salvador Moyà-Solà, publish this week in the prestigious scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA (PNAS) the results of their research regarding the find of a new genus of hominoid primate at els Hostalets de Pierola, l'Anoia. This fossil remains displays very...

2009-04-23 23:26:59

A 24-million-year-old fossil thought to be a missing link in evolution has been discovered in northern Canada, researchers said. Carnegie Museum of Natural History paleontologist Mary Dawson was a member of an international team that found the fossil, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review said Thursday. The find -- reported in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature -- may be the missing link between land carnivores and seals, sea lions and walruses, the newspaper said. San Diego State University...

ca7c1545566ec610a23a16408c7e1e9f1
2009-04-22 16:00:00

Scientists from Canada and the U.S. have discovered the skeleton of a previously unknown web-footed carnivore in Canada's Arctic. The researchers said their discovery sheds light on how seals developed from land-based mammals. The primitive animal, known as Puijila darwini, measured around 43 inches from nose to tail, and had a body similar to that of an otter, but a skull akin to a seal. New research suggests Puijila is a "missing link" in the evolution of the group that today includes...

2009-04-20 14:10:00

The fossil record usually shows what adult animals looked like. But the appearance and lifestyle of juvenile animals often differ dramatically from those of the adults. A classic example is provided by frogs and salamanders. New discoveries from Uppsala, Cambridge and Duke Universities, published in Science, show that some of the earliest backboned land animals also underwent such changes of lifestyle as they grew up. Professor Per Ahlberg at the Department of Physiology and Developmental...


Latest Transitional fossil Reference Libraries

42_6e9e514e1334f1d4f015f1cc3dc3896d
2007-12-21 13:22:00

Hyracotherium (Hyracotherium leporine), was once considered to be the earliest known member of the horse family. Now, though, it is considered to be part of the perissodactyl family related to both horses and brontotheres. Hyracotherium was a dog-sized perissodactyl ungulate that lived in the Northern Hemisphere, with species ranging throughout Asia, Europe, and North America during the Early to Mid Eocene, about 60 to 45 million years ago. The first fossils of this animal were found in...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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