Quantcast

Latest Transposon Stories

2012-01-12 21:39:16

A team of geneticists and computational biologists in the UK today reveal how an ancient mechanism is involved in gene control and continues to drive genome evolution. The new study is published in the journal Cell. To function properly, mammalian tissues require the protein CTCF, which has several key activities including the regulation of genes and interaction with proteins in the cell's nucleus to alter gene activity. CTCF acts by binding to DNA and plays a role in diseases such as HIV...

2011-12-22 15:42:35

New research illustrates how the genome adapts to a transposon invasion Small, mobile sequences of DNA left over from viruses, called transposons or "jumping genes" because of their ability to move around the genome, pose a significant threat to the genetic integrity and stability of an organism. Considered genetic parasites, these transposable elements are believed to comprise as much as 50 percent of the human genome. Because of the damage transposons can do to an organism's DNA, an...

2011-11-07 11:45:51

A jumping gene named Sleeping Beauty plays vital role in investigating cancer pathway A jumping gene with the fairy tale name "Sleeping Beauty" has helped to unlock vital clues for researchers investigating the genetics of colorectal cancer. A study published today used the Sleeping Beauty transposon system to profile the repertoire of genes that can drive colorectal cancer, identifying many more than previously thought. Around one third of these genes are mutated in human cancer, which...

What Makes Humans And Chimps Different?
2011-10-26 03:00:27

For years, scientists believed the vast phenotypic differences between humans and chimpanzees would be easily explained — the two species must have significantly different genetic makeups. However, when their genomes were later sequenced, researchers were surprised to learn that the DNA sequences of human and chimpanzee genes are nearly identical. What then is responsible for the many morphological and behavioral differences between the two species? Researchers at the Georgia Institute...

2011-09-26 13:08:46

Corn split off from its closest relative teosinte, a wild Mexican grass, about 10,000 years ago thanks to the breeding efforts of early Mexican farmers. Today it's hard to tell that the two plants were ever close kin: Corn plants stand tall, on a single sturdy stalk, and produce a handful of large, kernel-filled ears. By contrast, teosinte is branchy and bushy, with scores of thumb-sized "ears," each containing only a dozen or so hard-shelled kernels. In seeking to better understand how...

2011-09-26 11:24:59

Genetic parasites invaded the mammalian genome more than 100 million years ago and dramatically changed the way mammals reproduce -- transforming the uterus in the ancestors of humans and other mammals from the production of eggs to a nurturing home for developing young, a new Yale University study has found. The findings published online Sept. 25 in the journal Nature Genetics describe in unprecedented detail the molecular changes that allowed mammals to carry their developing young...

Researchers Produce First Genome Sequence Of Lizard
2011-08-31 12:43:03

  Researchers have produced the first genome sequence of a lizard. The green anole lizard is the first non-bird species of reptile to have its genome sequenced and assembled. Researchers have assembled and analyzed over 20 mammalian genomes, but the genetic landscape of reptiles remains relatively unexplored. "Sometimes you need to be at a certain distance in order to learn about how the human genome evolved," Jessica Alföldi, co-first author of the paper and a...

2011-08-30 12:23:50

A team at the Stanford University School of Medicine has cataloged, down to the letter, exactly what parts of the genetic code are essential for survival in one bacterial species, Caulobacter crescentus. They found that 12 percent of the bacteria's genetic material is essential for survival under laboratory conditions. The essential elements included not only protein-coding genes, but also regulatory DNA and, intriguingly, other small DNA segments of unknown function. The other 88 percent...

2011-05-11 12:00:00

LEXINGTON, Ky., and MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., May 11, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Transposagen Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. (Transposagen) and System Biosciences (SBI), both leaders in genetic modification technology, have announced a non-exclusive marketing and distribution agreement between the two biotechnology companies involving Transposagen's piggyBac(TM) technology. The piggyBac(TM) Genetic Modification System enables researchers to: Alter the genomes of numerous animal species with a simple...

2011-05-09 13:49:35

Mayo Clinic researchers have designed a new tool for identifying protein function from genetic code. A team led by Stephen Ekker, Ph.D., succeeded in switching individual genes off and on in zebrafish, then observing embryonic and juvenile development. The study appears in the journal Nature Methods. The work could help shed light on health-related problems such as how cancerous cells spread, what makes some people more prone to heart attacks, (http://www.mayoclinic.org/heart-attack/) or how...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
Related