Quantcast

Latest Transposon Stories

2010-05-24 08:23:01

Genetic variation due to DNA mutation is a driving force of adaptation and evolution, as well as a contributing factor to disease. However, the mechanisms governing DNA mutation rate are not well understood. In a report published online May 24 in Genome Research, researchers have identified intrinsic properties of DNA that influence mutation rate, shedding light on mechanisms involved in genome maintenance and potentially disease. Some DNA mutations are subject to natural selection, either...

2010-04-29 14:32:00

Rochester's 'Jumping Frog Lab' part of worldwide team decoding Xenopus tropicalis ROCHESTER, N.Y., April 29 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- An African clawed frog has joined the spotted green puffer fish, the honeybee, and the human among the ranks of more than 175 organisms that have had their genetic information nearly completely sequenced. While the research could help scientists better understand the factors causing the vast die-off of amphibians around the globe, scientists are also...

4a133a33241e2c6fccc98cd537a9aaf91
2010-04-29 14:55:11

Jumping Elements, Some of Which Cause Genetic Diseases, Become Incorporated in the Genome at Different Stages of Human Development The density of transposable (jumping) elements between sex chromosomes in primates may have important consequences for the studies of human genetic diseases, say Penn State University researchers.  Erika Kvikstad, a 2009 Penn State Ph.D. graduate in genetics, and Kateryna Makova, an associate professor of biology at Penn State, used a statistical regression...

90bc7379e958b988ec67b9ecfd57829c1
2010-04-25 13:23:04

First mice, then fruit flies, and now knockout nematodes Knocking genes out of action allows researchers to learn what genes do by seeing what goes wrong without them. University of Utah biologists pioneered the field. Mario Capecchi won a Nobel Prize for developing knockout mice. Kent Golic found a way to cripple fruit fly genes. Now, biologist Erik Jorgensen and colleagues have devised a procedure for knocking out genes in nematode worms. "We developed a method that allows us to walk...

2010-03-14 13:09:00

ROCKVILLE, Md., March 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Researchers from the J. Craig Venter Institute, along with more than 70 other researchers from around the world, have sequenced and analyzed the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, a fresh water member of the cnidaria -- stinging animals that include jellyfish, sea anemones and corals. The research, published in the March 14 edition of Nature, was co-led by Ewen F. Kirkness, JCVI, Jarrod A. Chapman, Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and...

2010-03-08 09:25:57

Argonaute 9 inhibits asexual reproduction, apparently by silencing transposons One seemingly insurmountable obstacle to the dream of virtually limitless yields of staple crops like corn, wheat and rice is the dependence of those plants on sexual reproduction. When male and female gametes -- sperm and egg -- combine randomly to generate a genetically unique seed, valuable parental traits painstakingly selected by breeders are erased. But what if plants like these could be engineered to...

2010-01-20 14:23:16

Inserting gene sequences in cultured cell lines is a main component of biomedical research, but inserting large sequences or multiple genes at the same time has been difficult. Now, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, and Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., have harnessed a plasmid-based "jumping gene" system called piggyBac transposon to accomplish this in a stable fashion, opening doors for new drug therapies for a variety of diseases,...

2010-01-08 15:54:54

Tag-team Approach Breaks the Size Barrier for Gene Therapy Neuroscientists have forged an unlikely molecular union as part of their fight against diseases of the brain and nervous system. The team has brought together the herpes virus and a molecule known as Sleeping Beauty to improve a technology known as gene therapy, which aims to manipulate genes to correct for molecular flaws that cause disease. The work, detailed in a paper published online in Gene Therapy, has allowed scientists at the...

2010-01-05 14:46:00

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have found that a group of genetic rogue elements, produced by DNA sequences commonly known as "Ëœjunk DNA', could help diagnose breast and bowel cancer. Their research, funded by Cancer Research UK, is published in this month's Genomics journal. The researchers, led by Dr Cristina Tufarelli, in the School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health Sciences, discovered that seven of these faulty genetic elements "” known as chimeric...

2009-12-15 20:52:31

Researchers at Uppsala University, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Broad Institute have discovered a previously unknown gene ZBED6 that is unique to placental mammals. The gene originates from a so called jumping gene that integrated in the genome of a primitive mammal at least 150 million years ago and has since then evolved an essential function. The study is published in PLoS Biology today. Domestic pigs develop more muscle and store less fat than their wild ancestor, the...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
Related