Quantcast

Latest Transposon Stories

2009-10-21 13:35:58

Bits of movable DNA called transposable elements or TEs fill up the genomes of plants and animals, but it has remained unclear how a genome can survive a rapid burst of hundreds, even thousands of new TE insertions. Now, for the first time, research led by plant biologists at the University of Georgia have documented the impact of such a burst in a rice strain that is accumulating more than 40 new TE insertions per plant per generation of an element called mPing. The big surprise of their...

91c930c584e9c27d20a8a0086edc51221
2009-10-16 11:01:48

First high-throughput analysis of every Salmonella Typhi gene For the first time, researchers are able to look at the need for every gene in a bacterial cell in a single experiment. The new method will transform the study of gene activity and the search for weaknesses in bacterial armories. Using a newly developed, next-gen sequencing method, a team established which genes Salmonella Typhi needs to survive and which are more of a luxury. The results and the method will be a boon to scientists...

2009-09-21 09:54:40

Scientists have identified how a protein enables sections of so-called junk DNA to be cut and pasted within genetic code "“ a finding which could speed development of gene therapies. The study by researchers at the University of Edinburgh sheds light on the process, known as DNA transposition, in which shifted genes have a significant effect on the behavior of neighboring genes. In the human genome, rearrangement of antibody genes can enable the immune system to target infection more...

2009-09-12 16:41:48

RNAi, a key biochemical pathway in the genetic control networks of most organisms, has now been discovered in Saccharomyces castellii, a close relative of the prototypical budding yeast S. cerevisiae, and in Candida albicans, a common human pathogen. Budding yeasts are used in research as models for more complicated organisms, in industry to create beer and biofuels, and in pharmaceuticals to produce drugs and vaccines. The ability to study RNAi in yeast and to use RNAi to alter the yeast's...

6ba4c2abc1c26d2c8df82caaf7df4106
2009-08-05 14:15:00

Rather than sticking to a single DNA script, human brain cells harbor astonishing genomic variability, according to scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The findings, to be published in the Aug. 5, 2009, advance online edition of Nature, could help explain brain development and individuality, as well as lead to a better understanding of neurological disease.The team, led by Fred Gage, Ph.D., a professor in the Salk's Laboratory of Genetics and holder of the Vi and John...

2009-08-05 14:02:46

Vectors derived from retroviruses are useful tools for long-term gene transfer because they allow stable integration of transgenes and propagation into daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors are preferred because they can transduce non-proliferating cellular targets. These vectors can be engineered to target specific tissues. In the August issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (www.cshprotocols.org/TOCs/toc8_09.dtl), François-Loïc Cosset and colleagues...

2009-07-31 12:10:50

Transposons are mobile genetic elements found in the hereditary material of humans and other organisms. They can replicate and the new copies can insert at novel sites in the genome. Because this threatens the whole organism, molecular mechanisms have evolved which can repress transposon activity. Professor Klaus Förstemann of the Gene Center of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich and a team of researchers working with the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster have now...

e59af2f82c3a49652f058e1bf2ab80bc1
2009-07-21 18:30:00

Planarian flatworms are only a few millimeters up to a few centimeters in length, live in freshwater and are the object of intense research, because they possess the extraordinary ability to regenerate lost tissue with the help of their stem cells (neoblasts) and even grow an entirely new worm out of minute amputated body parts. Now researchers from the Max Delbrck Center in Berlin, Germany together with researchers in the US and Canada present the first comprehensive catalogue of small RNAs...

2009-07-09 06:33:16

Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition has identified a genomic fragment, called a transposon, or "jumping gene," that diminishes the activity of the diabetes risk gene in both mice and humans. Transposons are sequences of DNA that can move around to different positions within the genome of a single cell, hence their nickname "jumping genes." Researchers studied the genomes of mouse strains that were obese but had no elevated blood glucose levels and were less susceptible to...

2009-06-11 15:40:00

Gene insertions have implications for understanding development of genetic diseases, cancerJumping genes do most of their jumping, not during the development of sperm and egg cells, but during the development of the embryo itself. The research, published this month in Genes and Development, "challenges standard assumptions on the timing of when mobile DNA, so-called jumping genes, insert into the human genome," says senior author Haig H. Kazazian Jr., MD, Seymour Gray Professor of Molecular...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
Related