Quantcast

Latest Transposon Stories

7eeaa24bcef21fb212072c09e230c7121
2008-11-28 12:01:13

Hereditary information flows from parents to offspring not just through DNA but also through the millions of proteins and other molecules that cling to it.

7018e50bdae20dda60005cd799bbba6a
2008-11-05 11:20:00

In a paper published in Genome Research on Nov. 4, scientists at the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) report that what was previously believed to be "junk" DNA is one of the important ingredients distinguishing humans from other species.

647982933de934ac5bab7ed5a75572bb1
2008-02-25 14:10:00

Iowa State University researchers helped write the first draft of the corn genome sequence that will be announced Thursday, Feb. 28, at the 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference in Washington, D.C.

2005-08-11 21:35:00

Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers have harnessed a mobile gene from the cabbage looper moth and modified it for routine use to determine the function of genes in mice and other vertebrates. If the new tool works as they expect, it will speed understanding of genes involved in human biology and disease and accelerate the search for effective new therapies.

49dcff93214e698c972bfd650f3837f91
2005-08-13 10:14:26

A collaborative project between American and Chinese researchers developed a way to study the function of genes in mice and man by using a moveable genetic element from moths, according to a report in the journal Cell.

2005-08-06 15:36:16

In a paper published in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), MBL scientists Irina R. Arkhipova and Matthew Meselson provide evidence that suggests bdelloid rotifers--which probably gave up sex at least 50 million years ago but have still evolved into 370 species--handle DNA transposons more efficiently than other asexual species.

f4473979fa7aa84261dc3257a42efff01
2005-07-24 18:40:00

In 1909, while harvesting a typical corn crop (Zea mays) in Illinois, a field worker noticed a plant so unusual that it was initially believed to be a new species. Its "peculiarly shaped ear" was "laid aside as a curiosity" and the specimen was designated Zea ramosa (from the Latin ramosus, "having many branches"). Due to the alteration of a single gene, later named ramosa1, both the ear and the tassel of the plant were more highly branched than usual, leading to loose, crooked kernel rows...

2005-07-15 02:30:43

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute have discovered a new method that could accelerate the way cancer-causing genes are found and could lead to a more accurate identification of the genes, according to two studies in the July 14, 2005, issue of Nature.

2005-06-30 13:47:21

A group of LSU researchers, led by biological sciences Professor Mark Batzer, have unraveled the details of a 25-million-year-old evolutionary process in the human genome.

2005-06-17 10:00:00

Scientists document temporal bias in gene duplication events for a complex region of human chromosome 2.


Word of the Day
saggar
  • A ceramic container used inside a fuel-fired kiln to protect pots from the flame.
The word 'saggar' may come from 'safeguard'.
Related