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Latest Tree cricket Stories

Courtship In The Cricket World
2012-04-30 14:20:09

Everyone wants to present themselves in the best light - especially when it comes to finding a partner. Some rely on supplying honest information about their attributes while others exaggerate for good effect. A new study by researchers at the University of Bristol, published in PNAS, has discovered how male crickets could use similar tactics to attract a mate. Male crickets advertise for mates by singing loud repetitive songs at night. They rub their wings together, setting them into...


Latest Tree cricket Reference Libraries

40_941d9b831618c7e24a221338360c02ca
2005-09-08 14:48:50

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects which are related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera). They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae and are known for their chirp (which only male crickets can do; male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" instrument). They chirp by rubbing their wings over each other, and the song is species-specific. There are two types of cricket songs: a calling song and a courting song. The...

0_80b600c3cd3494e8a4c494affbdaba4d
2005-07-13 16:57:18

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera). They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae. Crickets are known for the loud chirping noises they make by rubbing their wings together. Only male crickets sing as the male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" that produces a song that is species specific. Interestingly in 1970, Dr. William H. Cade discovered that the parasitic fly Ormia...

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