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2009-09-18 08:47:20

Researchers at North Carolina State University are working to demonstrate that trees can be used to degrade or capture fuels that leak into soil and ground water. Through a process called phytoremediation "“ literally a "green" technology "“ plants and trees remove pollutants from the environment or render them harmless. Through a partnership with state and federal government agencies, the military and industry, Dr. Elizabeth Nichols, environmental technology professor in NC...

2009-09-15 11:20:00

One-hour NGC Episode Premieres Tuesday, September 29, 2009, at 10 p.m. ET/PT --October Magazine Includes Pull-Out Poster of Full-Length Digital Portrait of Redwood Tree, Composed of 84 Images Stitched Together WASHINGTON, Sept. 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- This fall, National Geographic journeys deep into the great redwood forests on the American West Coast. For the first time, we'll size up the health and future of the entire redwood range and scale the trees to glimpse rich canopy...

2009-09-08 13:19:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., Sept. 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Consumers can help offset the pollution that leads to a warmer climate by learning how to plant and care for a tree this fall, said Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Acting Secretary John Quigley. The classes are a part of TreeVitalize, a partnership to restore tree cover in the 14 metropolitan areas in Pennsylvania. "In addition to making our homes and communities look attractive, trees clean the air and store carbon...

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2009-08-25 14:50:00

Scientists said today at the 2nd World Congress of Agroforestry that a type of acacia tree with an unusual growth habit-unlike virtually all other trees-holds particular promise for farmers in Africa as a free source of nitrogen for their soils that could last generations.For further information, please contact: Megan Dold: +1 301 280 5720 or mdold@burnesscommunications.comWith its nitrogen-fixing qualities, the tall, long-lived acacia tree, Faidherbia albida (Mgunga in Swahili) could limit...

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2009-08-21 09:55:00

New algorithm explores future changes in plant populationsThe ability to envisage the future may be closer than you would think. A recent paper by Sean Hammond and Karl Niklas in the August 2009 issue of the American Journal of Botany (available here) presents an algorithm that may be used to predict the future dynamics of plant communities, an increasingly interesting area of study as significant environmental changes, such as global climate change and invasive species, are affecting current...

2009-08-14 17:52:00

CHAMPAIGN, Ill., Aug. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- At the 85th International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Conference & Trade Show held in Providence, Rhode Island, ISA President Lauren Lanphear introduced Sandy Clark (Mount Prospect, Illinois), Gerard Fournier (Didsbury, Alberta, Canada), Edward Hopkins (Rochester, New Hampshire), Dave Leonard (Lexington, Kentucky), Harold Spiegel (Dallas, Texas), Dennis Swartzell (Las Vegas, Nevada) and Philip van Wassanear (Mississauga, Ontario, Canada) as...

2009-08-06 11:19:23

With summer in full swing, many plants are at their peak bloom and climbing plants, like clematis, morning glories, and sweet peas, are especially remarkable. Not only are these plants beautiful, but their ability to climb walls and trellises is an impressive feat of biological engineering that has taken millions of years to accomplish.A recent article by Dr. Sandrine Isnard and Dr. Wendy Silk in the July issue of the American Journal of Botany explores the logistics of this incredible...

2009-07-30 11:14:01

 Scientists are comparing annual growth rings of the Pacific Northwest's largest bivalve and its most iconic tree for clues to how living organisms may have responded to changes in climate.Analyzed by themselves, the rings from a single tree or mollusk may sometimes reflect conditions that are either favorable or unfavorable for growth. When scientists look at numerous individuals of the same species, however, the consistency of the ring patterns allows them to build a model and compare...

2009-07-25 11:36:00

NAPERVILLE, Ill., July 25 /PRNewswire/ -- More than 70 cyclists in the 2009 STIHL Tour des Trees planted trees along a 500-mile route beginning in New York City's Central Park and winding across the Northeast. Riders from across the world have so far raised a total of $373,543 during this year's tour, July 19-25, to benefit the Tree Research and Education Endowment (TREE) Fund. Donations are accepted through August 15. Cyclists of all ages and abilities rode with the mission to raise money...

2009-07-01 01:06:32

Researchers say baldcypress trees in central Texas provide a record of past weather and clues to the region's future. Malcolm Cleaveland of the University of Arkansas and his team have been taking cores from the trees that show the rings, the Austin American-Statesman reported Tuesday. Each ring represents a year in the tree's life, with thin ones being years of drought and thicker ones those when rainfall was more plentiful. The tree rings give you a perspective you can't get in any other...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.