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Latest Trees of Canada Stories

2008-07-05 09:00:14

By Debra McCown, Bristol Herald Courier, Va. Jul. 5--ABINGDON, Va. -- The region's forests are not what they used to be. Never mind old-timers' talk about the days before clear-cutting and construction; the problem is much more sinister. One by one, native tree species are falling victim to foreign insects that take no prisoners, and experts say it's only going to get worse. Walking through the woods today, it's nearly impossible to find an American chestnut, the durable hardwood...

2007-09-25 18:00:27

U.S. researchers travel to Canada next spring to study simulated global warming involving about 2,000 sugar maple tree seedlings. Northern Illinois University Professors Lesley Rigg and David Goldblum have been awarded a $260,000 National Science Foundation grant to simulate global warming on sugar maple seedlings now growing in Canada's Lake Superior Provincial Park. The researchers will build rain-exclusion, temperature-controlled structures over the seedlings to simulate temperature...

2007-04-19 06:00:00

By Abrams, Marc D No species in the eastern United States better exemplifies a ubiquitous yet subordinate tree than does blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica). What enables blackgum to grow nearly everywhere, but almost always at very low densities? It is the longest-lived hardwood species in the eastern United States, with a maximum age that can exceed 650 years. It is inherently slow growing, which most likely explains its great longevity and high shade tolerance; it is also one of the few tree...

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2004-11-26 05:00:00

There are more Christmas trees than people in Colebrook, N.H. There are 500,000 trees alone at Weir Tree Farms, a family-owned farm considered to be the town's largest - that's 200 times more trees than Colebrook's population of 2,500. "We're trying to grow a lot of nice trees and make a lot of children happy at Christmas time," said William Weir, 65, whose family will cut 14,000 balsam fir, fraser fir and "fralsam" hybrids this year. Perched on the Vermont border, Colebrook is considered...


Latest Trees of Canada Reference Libraries

31_333f4ba6ce441299fd45fac924790ec1
2007-12-27 09:32:46

The American Beech (Fagus grandifolia), is a species of beech native to eastern North America. It can be found from Nova Scotia west to southern Ontario in Canada, and Wisconsin south to eastern Texas and east to northern Florida in the United States. Trees in the southern half of its range are sometimes distinguished as a separate species. A related beech native to the mountains of central Mexico is sometimes treated as a subspecies of the American Beech, but is actually a separate species,...

0_e3298ca02c15c613d4740c49ab0c6c75
2007-12-27 09:13:38

The Balsam Fir (Abies balsamea), is a North American fir, native to most of eastern and central Canada and the northeastern United States. In Canada it is found from Newfoundland to central Alberta. In the United States the Balsam Fir is found from Minnesota to Maine, and south in the Appalachian Mountains to West Virginia. It is a small to medium-size evergreen tree from 45 to 65 feet tall, with a narrow conic crown. Few balsams may grow to over 85 feet tall. The bark on young trees is...

35_876a98e81e2bc4d308fd55de0202b764
2005-06-14 10:31:10

Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis, synomym B. lutea), is a species of birch native to eastern North America, from Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec west to Minnesota, and south in the Appalachian Mountains to northern Georgia. It is the Provincial tree of Quebec and the name reflects the color of the tree's bark. This medium-sized deciduous tree reaches 20 m tall (exceptionally to 30 m) with a trunk up to 80 cm diameter. The bark is smooth, yellow-bronze, flaking in fine...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'