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Latest Triassic Stories

Swimming Behaviors Of Triassic Sea Creatures Identified Based On Paddle Print Fossils
2014-06-12 07:48:30

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Earth is full of evidence that dinosaurs once walked our planet. From fossil fuels to fossils themselves, the dinosaurs left their mark. These prehistoric creatures also left their footprints. Footprints can be found from Texas to China, tantalizing the imagination of the public and researchers alike. Such tracks have been found in an ancient seabed in China that, according to an international research team from the University of...

Amphibians, Dinosaurs Were The New Large Predators After The Mass Extinction
2014-03-20 12:37:13

University of Zurich 252 million years ago the largest extinction event occurred at the end of the Permian age. It wiped out almost 90 percent of all life in water. So far researchers had assumed that the ecosystems gradually recovered from this catastrophe over a long stretch of eight to nine million years and that large predators at the uppermost end of the food chain were the last to reappear. A Swiss-American team of palaeontologists headed by Torsten Scheyer and Carlo Romano from the...

Fossilized Feces From Dino Ancestors Shared A Toilette
2013-11-29 12:21:23

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Seeing a pile of feces usually sends people running, but a team of paleontologists has leaped head-long into an ancient collection of poo believed to be about 240 million years old, according to a new study in the journal Scientific Reports. Dubbed the “world’s first public toilet,” the site in Argentina is the earliest known evidence of ancient reptiles sharing a collective dumping ground. Modern animals such as elephants and...

Mass Extinction During The Pangea Integration
2013-11-04 03:21:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The integration of Pangea that began during the early Permian period may have caused the environment to deteriorate, playing a role in the mass extinction event that occurred 250 million years ago, according to research appearing in the most recent edition of the journal Science China Earth Sciences. In the study, co-authors, professor Yin Hongfu and Dr. Song Haijun of the State Key Laboratory of Geobiology and Environmental...

Mammal Diversity Faltered When Flowering Plants Arrived
2013-10-02 16:02:24

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As mammals were trying to emerge from the shadows of dinosaurs 100 million years ago, there was a dramatic proliferation of flowering plant species. However, instead of early mammals benefiting from new food and shelter opportunities that would have been provided by the plants, they experienced a decline during the mid-Cretaceous. Using a morphological analysis, two researchers were able to provide these new insights about mammalian...

End-Permian Mass Extinction Paved Way For Modern Mammals
2013-08-28 16:19:55

Peter Suciu for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mass extinction certainly sounds like it would be the end of the line, and perhaps even evokes images of the end of the world. However, new research conducted by the University of Lincoln, the National Museum in Bloemfontein, South Africa, and the University of Bristol suggests that the end can also be the beginning. This research, which was published this month in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, noted that the ancient closest...

Ancient Mammals Evolution Mass Extinction
2013-08-14 09:52:22

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online With the continuous expansion of human activity around the world, many species are facing the increasing threat of extinction as their habitats shrink and shift. Yet life on planet Earth has faced even larger extinction threats in the past. A new study int the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B examines how a group of mammalian relatives called anomodonts coped with a mass extinction event of the prehistoric past as a way to...

Strange Bedfellows: Odd Couple Fossils Discovered In The Same Burrow
2013-06-23 03:58:36

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Sorry, Felix and Oscar, but an international team of researchers have found a real-life odd couple that puts Neil Simon’s famous duo to shame – a mammal forerunner and an ancient amphibian, which were discovered sharing a burrow during the Early Triassic period. The discovery, which was detailed in Friday’s edition of the journal PLOS One, was made by scientists from South Africa, Australia and France while studying a 250...

Ichthyosaur Fossil Indicates Dolphin-Like Dinos Survived Into Jurassic
2013-05-15 14:43:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A fossil previously used as a stepping stone for mules has deepened the mystery surrounding the evolution of ichthyosaurs, dolphin-like marine reptiles that were contemporaries of the dinosaurs. According to a newly published report in the journal“¯Biology Letters,“¯an analysis of the fossil, dubbed Malawania anachronus, has suggested that ichthyosaurs survived well into the...

Mass Extinction Made Space Dinosaur Forerunners
2013-04-30 09:47:00

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 252 million years ago, during the world´s largest mass extinction event, nine out of ten species vanished from the planet. Based on fossil records from sites in South Africa and southwest Russia, many scientists have long thought the predecessors of dinosaurs largely missed the race to fill habitat niches that were emptied during this event. However, according to an international team of scientists, it turns out...


Latest Triassic Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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