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Latest Triassic Stories

Giant Marine Predator Fossil Unearthed In The Nevada Desert
2013-01-08 08:15:49

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a new report, a multinational research team details the recovery of a fossil marine predator. The animal, which measured about 28 feet in length, was recovered from the Nevada desert in 2010. This fossil, found in what is today a remote mountain range, represents the first top predator in marine food chains feeding on prey similar to its own size. A major portion of the animal was preserved, including the skull, parts of the fins,...

Climate Changes After Mass Extinction Modeled By Researchers
2012-12-22 07:09:20

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While it has long been assumed plant and animal life took a long time to recover following the largest mass extinction to date, researchers from the University of Zurich have discovered new evidence to suggest they may have bounced back sooner than previously believed. The mass extinction in question took place at the end of the Permian geological period some 252 million years ago, and scientists had long believed it took roughly...

Fossil Discovery May Be Of Earliest Living Dinosaur
2012-12-05 09:40:27

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Some of the earliest known dinosaurs to have walked the planet were considered to be small dinosaurs like the swift-footed Eoraptor. But researchers have discovered a new dinosaur-like fossil that may be even older. Called Nyasasaurus parringtoni, the specimen is thought to have existed 10 to 15 million years earlier than dinosaur fossils have previously shown, originating in the Middle rather than the Late Triassic Period. Study...

2012-10-01 14:19:07

Recently, a mysterious seed fern, Lepidopteris baodensis sp. nov., dating to more than 251 million years ago (Ma), was discovered at the Baijiagou of Baode, Shanxi, China, from the Upper Permian Sunjiagou Formation. This discovery completely changed the understanding of the stratigraphic distribution of the genus Lepidopteris in China and promoted the taxonomic study of late Paleozoic plants. Since Schimper erected the genus Lepidopteris in 1869, its epidermal structure of subepidermal...

2012-02-03 19:00:35

Around 250 million years ago, most life on Earth was wiped out in an extinction known as the “Great Dying.” A team led by University of Cincinnati geologist Thomas J. Algeo finds that the end came slowly from thousands of centuries of volcanic activity. A painstakingly detailed investigation shows that mass extinctions need not be sudden events. The deadliest mass extinction of all took a long time to kill 90 percent of Earth´s marine life, and it killed in stages,...

Image 1 - Land Animals Suffered Catastrophic Losses After Permian Period
2011-10-26 06:31:51

The cataclysmic events that marked the end of the Permian Period some 252 million years ago were a watershed moment in the history of life on Earth. As much as 90 percent of ocean organisms were extinguished, ushering in a new order of marine species, some of which we still see today. But while land dwellers certainly sustained major losses, the extent of extinction and the reshuffling afterward were less clear. In a paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B,...

Image 1 - New Technique Unlocks Secrets Of Ancient Ocean
2011-10-11 11:53:04

ASU researchers develop new method to learn about Earth's largest mass extinction event Earth's largest mass extinction event, the end-Permian mass extinction, occurred some 252 million years ago. An estimated 90 percent of Earth's marine life was eradicated. To better understand the cause of this "mother of all mass extinctions," researchers from Arizona State University and the University of Cincinnati used a new geochemical technique. The team measured uranium isotopes in ancient...

2011-10-10 09:23:41

Results contradict several theories for cause of extinction While the cause of the mass extinction that occurred between the Permian and Triassic periods is still uncertain, two University of Rhode Island researchers collected data that show that terrestrial biodiversity recovered much faster than previously thought, potentially contradicting several theories for the cause of the extinction. David Fastovsky, URI professor of geosciences, and graduate student David Tarailo found that...

2011-10-03 14:16:45

Harsh living conditions caused by major fluctuations in the carbon content and sea levels, overacidification and oxygen deficiency in the seas triggered the largest mass extinction of all time at the end of the Permian era 252 million years ago. Life on Earth was also anything but easy after the obliteration of over 90 percent of all species: Throughout the entire Early Triassic era, metazoan-dominated reefs were replaced by microbial deposits. Researchers had always assumed it took the Earth...

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2011-05-15 09:43:23

More than 200 million years ago, mammals and reptiles lived in their own separate worlds on the supercontinent Pangaea, despite little geographical incentive to do so. Mammals lived in areas of twice-yearly seasonal rainfall; reptiles stayed in areas where rains came just once a year. Mammals lose more water when they excrete, and thus need water-rich environments to survive. Results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Aggregating nearly the entire landmass of...