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Latest Triassic Stories

Mass Extinction Made Space Dinosaur Forerunners
2013-04-30 09:47:00

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 252 million years ago, during the world´s largest mass extinction event, nine out of ten species vanished from the planet. Based on fossil records from sites in South Africa and southwest Russia, many scientists have long thought the predecessors of dinosaurs largely missed the race to fill habitat niches that were emptied during this event. However, according to an international team of scientists, it turns out...

Megavolcanoes Led To End-Triassic Extinction Allowing Dinosaurs To Evolve
2013-03-22 04:19:11

WATCH VIDEO: [Drilling Into The Jurassic In New Jersey] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Popular theory suggests that a massive asteroid smashed into Earth around 65 million years ago wiping most life, including the dinosaurs, off the face of the earth. Now, scientists have found evidence of another planetary cataclysm that occurred some 135 million years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction (CPE) event. An examination of evidence across three continents...

Giant Marine Predator Fossil Unearthed In The Nevada Desert
2013-01-08 08:15:49

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a new report, a multinational research team details the recovery of a fossil marine predator. The animal, which measured about 28 feet in length, was recovered from the Nevada desert in 2010. This fossil, found in what is today a remote mountain range, represents the first top predator in marine food chains feeding on prey similar to its own size. A major portion of the animal was preserved, including the skull, parts of the fins,...

Climate Changes After Mass Extinction Modeled By Researchers
2012-12-22 07:09:20

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While it has long been assumed plant and animal life took a long time to recover following the largest mass extinction to date, researchers from the University of Zurich have discovered new evidence to suggest they may have bounced back sooner than previously believed. The mass extinction in question took place at the end of the Permian geological period some 252 million years ago, and scientists had long believed it took roughly...

Fossil Discovery May Be Of Earliest Living Dinosaur
2012-12-05 09:40:27

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Some of the earliest known dinosaurs to have walked the planet were considered to be small dinosaurs like the swift-footed Eoraptor. But researchers have discovered a new dinosaur-like fossil that may be even older. Called Nyasasaurus parringtoni, the specimen is thought to have existed 10 to 15 million years earlier than dinosaur fossils have previously shown, originating in the Middle rather than the Late Triassic Period. Study...

2012-10-01 14:19:07

Recently, a mysterious seed fern, Lepidopteris baodensis sp. nov., dating to more than 251 million years ago (Ma), was discovered at the Baijiagou of Baode, Shanxi, China, from the Upper Permian Sunjiagou Formation. This discovery completely changed the understanding of the stratigraphic distribution of the genus Lepidopteris in China and promoted the taxonomic study of late Paleozoic plants. Since Schimper erected the genus Lepidopteris in 1869, its epidermal structure of subepidermal...

2012-02-03 19:00:35

Around 250 million years ago, most life on Earth was wiped out in an extinction known as the “Great Dying.” A team led by University of Cincinnati geologist Thomas J. Algeo finds that the end came slowly from thousands of centuries of volcanic activity. A painstakingly detailed investigation shows that mass extinctions need not be sudden events. The deadliest mass extinction of all took a long time to kill 90 percent of Earth´s marine life, and it killed in stages,...

Image 1 - Land Animals Suffered Catastrophic Losses After Permian Period
2011-10-26 06:31:51

The cataclysmic events that marked the end of the Permian Period some 252 million years ago were a watershed moment in the history of life on Earth. As much as 90 percent of ocean organisms were extinguished, ushering in a new order of marine species, some of which we still see today. But while land dwellers certainly sustained major losses, the extent of extinction and the reshuffling afterward were less clear. In a paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B,...

Image 1 - New Technique Unlocks Secrets Of Ancient Ocean
2011-10-11 11:53:04

ASU researchers develop new method to learn about Earth's largest mass extinction event Earth's largest mass extinction event, the end-Permian mass extinction, occurred some 252 million years ago. An estimated 90 percent of Earth's marine life was eradicated. To better understand the cause of this "mother of all mass extinctions," researchers from Arizona State University and the University of Cincinnati used a new geochemical technique. The team measured uranium isotopes in ancient...

2011-10-10 09:23:41

Results contradict several theories for cause of extinction While the cause of the mass extinction that occurred between the Permian and Triassic periods is still uncertain, two University of Rhode Island researchers collected data that show that terrestrial biodiversity recovered much faster than previously thought, potentially contradicting several theories for the cause of the extinction. David Fastovsky, URI professor of geosciences, and graduate student David Tarailo found that...


Latest Triassic Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

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Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'