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Latest Triassic Stories

2011-10-03 14:16:45

Harsh living conditions caused by major fluctuations in the carbon content and sea levels, overacidification and oxygen deficiency in the seas triggered the largest mass extinction of all time at the end of the Permian era 252 million years ago. Life on Earth was also anything but easy after the obliteration of over 90 percent of all species: Throughout the entire Early Triassic era, metazoan-dominated reefs were replaced by microbial deposits. Researchers had always assumed it took the Earth...

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2011-05-15 09:43:23

More than 200 million years ago, mammals and reptiles lived in their own separate worlds on the supercontinent Pangaea, despite little geographical incentive to do so. Mammals lived in areas of twice-yearly seasonal rainfall; reptiles stayed in areas where rains came just once a year. Mammals lose more water when they excrete, and thus need water-rich environments to survive. Results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Aggregating nearly the entire landmass of...

2011-01-25 11:26:13

Careful dating of new dinosaur fossils and volcanic ash around them by researchers from UC Davis and UC Berkeley casts doubt on the idea that dinosaurs appeared and opportunistically replaced other animals. Instead -- at least in one South American valley -- they seem to have existed side by side and gone through similar periods of extinction. Geologists from Argentina and the United States announced earlier this month the discovery of a new dinosaur that roamed what is now South America 230...

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2011-01-10 13:22:20

Geologists at Brown University and the University of Washington have a cautionary tale: Lose enough species in the oceans, and the entire ecosystem could collapse. Looking at two of the greatest mass extinctions in Earth's history, the scientists attribute the ecosystems' collapse to a loss in the variety of species sharing the same space. It took up to 10 million years after the mass extinctions for the ecosystem to stabilize. The findings appear in Geology. The world's oceans are under...

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2010-12-22 09:25:00

A massive new fossil site discovered in southwestern China marks the first discovery of a complete ecosystem which recovered following a mass extinction. According to Guardian Science Correspondent Ian Sample, "the spectacular haul of 20,000 fossils," which was discovered at a hillside in what it now Luoping county in the Yunnan Province of China, were "beautifully preserved" and included "mollusks, sea urchins and arthropods, alongside much larger animals that occupied the top of the food...

2010-10-28 15:15:13

More than 251 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period, Earth almost became a lifeless planet. Around 90 percent of all living species disappeared then, in what scientists have called "The Great Dying." Thomas J. Algeo, has spent much of the past decade investigating the chemical evidence buried in rocks formed during this major extinction. The University of Cincinnati professor of geology has worked with a team of scientific colleagues to understand the ancient catastrophe. Algeo...

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2010-03-23 12:05:00

Volcanic activity more than 200 million years ago may have helped dinosaurs become and remain the world's dominant species by causing the mass extinction of rivals, researchers claim in a recent study. The paper, which was completed by a five-person team of researchers from the United States and Taiwan and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), suggests that it was mass volcanic eruptions that wiped out the crurotarsans, the crocodile-like creatures that were...

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2010-03-22 14:21:34

A scientific team led by Brown University has learned how dinosaurs became rulers of Earth more than 200 million years ago. Widespread volcanism and a spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide wiped out half of all plant species, and extinguished early crocodile relatives that had competed with the earliest dinosaurs. Results appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. A shade more than 200 million years ago, the Earth looked far different than it does today. Most land on the...

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2010-03-03 13:00:00

Paleontologists have discovered a dinosaur-like animal that lived 10 million years earlier than the oldest known dinosaurs, suggesting that dinosaurs and close relatives such as pterosaurs (flying reptiles) originated much earlier than scientists previously thought. The research also suggests that at least three times in the evolution of dinosaurs and their closest relatives, meat-eating animals evolved into animals with diets that included plants. These shifts all occurred in less than 10...

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2009-12-03 14:00:00

The largest known mass extinction in Earth's history, about 252 million years ago at the end of the Permian Period, may have been caused by global warming. A new fossil species suggests that some land animals may have survived the end-Permian extinction by living in cooler climates in Antarctica. Jörg Fröbisch and Kenneth D. Angielczyk of The Field Museum together with Christian A. Sidor from the University of Washington have identified a distant relative of mammals, Kombuisia...


Latest Triassic Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

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Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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