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2009-10-02 13:11:47

Tiny organisms that covered the planet more than 250 million years ago appear to be a species of ancient fungus that thrived in dead wood, according to new research published October 1 in the journal Geology. The researchers behind the study, from Imperial College London and other universities in the UK, USA and The Netherlands, believe that the organisms were able to thrive during this period because the world's forests had been wiped out. This would explain how the organisms, which are...

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2009-03-02 13:35:07

South Africa's Karoo Basin Shows No Indication of "Boundary Event Rock Bed" New scientific findings by geologist Robert Gastaldo of Colby College in Waterville, Maine, and colleagues call into question popular theories about the largest mass extinction in Earth's history. A paper reporting the results by Gastaldo, South African scientist Johann Neveling, and two 2008 Colby undergraduate students, C. Kittinger "Kit" Clark and Sophie Newbury, appears in the March 2009 issue of GEOLOGY. Tens of...

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2008-10-07 10:34:46

Evidence suggests that 'sick Earth' extinctions more likely In geology as in cancer research, the silver bullet theory always gets the headlines and nearly always turns out to be wrong. For geologists who study mass extinctions, the silver bullet is a giant asteroid plunging to earth. But an asteroid is the prime suspect only in the most recent of five mass extinctions, said USC earth scientist David Bottjer. The cataclysm 65 million years ago wiped out the dinosaurs. "The other four have not...

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2008-10-01 10:15:00

Dinosaurs survived two mass extinctions and 50 million years before taking over the world and dominating ecosystems, according to new research published this week. Reporting in Biology Letters, Steve Brusatte, Professor Michael Benton, and colleagues at the University of Bristol show that dinosaurs did not proliferate immediately after they originated, but that their rise was a slow and complicated event, and driven by two mass extinctions. "The sheer size of dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus...

2008-09-19 03:00:23

By Radley, Jonathan Twitchett, Richard J; Mander, Luke; Cope, John Journal, Vol. 165, 2008, pp. 319-332 Jonathan Radley writes: The Penarth Group (of Late Triassic and possibly ranging to Early Jurassic age) of the southern UK marks a marine transgression and the establishment of a shallow epicontinental seaway (Hallam & El Shaarawy 1982; Warrington & Ivimey-Cook 1992), influenced by regressive-transgressive pulses and characterized by rapid facies changes (Hallam & Wignall...

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2008-09-12 09:10:00

By the skin of their teeth 200 million years ago, dinosaurs defeated a fierce group of beasts competing for the right to rule the Earth, said scientists Tuesday. Dinosaurs emerged 230 million years ago, in the Triassic Period, and battled for almost 30 million years with a faction of vicious reptiles called crurotarsans, relatives of contemporary crocodiles that developed into gargantuan sizes and resembled dinosaurs. For awhile, most scientists supposed dinosaurs were basically more advanced...

2008-09-09 03:00:08

Large, impressive fossils of dinosaurs and big animals such as elephants are usually the only ones that show up in news reports. But most paleontologists work on less well-known creatures that might not be as impressive but are more common and just as important in understanding past ecosystems. One of the groups frequently discussed among paleontologists is the protorosaurs. Protorosaurs were a widespread but rare group of reptiles that first appeared late in the Permian Period (299-251...

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2008-06-08 20:00:00

For the first time paleontologists have found fossilized burrows of tetrapods "“ any land vertebrates with four legs or leglike appendages "“ in Antarctica dating from the Early Triassic epoch, about 245 million years ago.The fossils were created when fine sand from an overflowing river poured into the animals' burrows and hardened into casts of the open spaces. The largest preserved piece is about 14 inches long, 6 inches wide and 3 inches deep. No animal remains were found...

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2008-01-21 10:15:00

The full recovery of ecological systems, following the most devastating extinction event of all time, took at least 30 million years, according to new research from the University of Bristol. About 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian, a major extinction event killed over 90 per cent of life on earth, including insects, plants, marine animals, amphibians, and reptiles. Ecosystems were destroyed worldwide, communities were restructured and organisms were left struggling to...

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2008-01-18 10:12:40

The full recovery of ecological systems, following the most devastating extinction event of all time, took at least 30 million years, according to new research from the University of Bristol. About 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian, a major extinction event killed over 90 per cent of life on earth, including insects, plants, marine animals, amphibians, and reptiles. Ecosystems were destroyed worldwide, communities were restructured and organisms were left struggling to recover....


Latest Triassic Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

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Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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