Quantcast
Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 17:35 EDT

Latest Trichodesmium Stories

Wobble Of The Earth Rings The Ocean Dinner Bell For Tiny Ocean Creatures
2013-09-14 04:18:52

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The nutrient known as “fixed” nitrogen, which is essential to the health of the ocean, is controlled by the cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis, researchers from Princeton University and the Swiss Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) claim in research appearing in the journal Nature. According to the study authors, the discovery will give scientists new insight into how the ocean regulates its own life-support system,...

Ocean Food Chain Likely Disrupted By Climate Change
2013-07-03 08:08:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the University of Southern California (USC) reveals climate change may be weeding out the bacteria that form the base of the ocean's food chain by selecting certain strains for survival. There are winners and losers in everything, including climate change. Knowing which organisms will thrive and which will perish as atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and temperatures rise globally is increasingly important to...

2012-07-09 10:21:15

HAMILTON, Bermuda, July 9, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- When it comes to climate change, few people think about potential impacts on bacteria, but that's just what a team of researchers from the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) and Princeton University did in a recent study chosen as the feature article in today's issue of Aquatic Microbial Ecology. Led by Dr. Michael Lomas, PI of the Phytoplankton Ecology Lab at BIOS, the team investigated the short-term responses of photosynthetic...

ccb75702f051b89c932a4e369f71d1d61
2010-02-25 15:21:42

Novel species found to be more widely distributed in world's seas Marine scientists long believed that a microbe called Trichodesmium, a member of a group called the cyanobacteria, reigned over the ocean's nitrogen budget. New research results reported on-line today in a paper in Science Express show that Trichodesmium may have to share its nitrogen-fixing throne: two others of its kind, small spherical species of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria called UCYN-A and Crocosphaera watsonii, are also...

d4951def6ea274fd726987e080629399
2009-11-02 13:40:00

Nitrogen fixation in the Atlantic Scientists including researchers from the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton and the University of Essex have discovered that interactions between iron supply, transported through the atmosphere from deserts, and large-scale oceanic circulation control the availability of a crucial nutrient, nitrogen, in the Atlantic. Their findings have potentially important implications for understanding global climate, both past and future. Nitrogen is an essential...

ad4fda9b4e63453a6bfa587c01b10bde1
2009-09-30 13:53:27

Trichodesmium has important role in nitrogen cycle and carbon sequestration A new study of microscopic marine microbes, called phytoplankton, by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the University of South Carolina has solved a ten-year-old mystery about the source of an essential nutrient in the ocean. Roughly a decade ago scientists discovered a rare form of organic phosphorus in marine organic matter. Not only were the researchers surprised to find this form of...

2009-08-14 10:26:43

Observations made by Southampton scientists help understand the massive blooms of microscopic marine algae "“ phytoplankton "“ in the seas around Madagascar and its effect on the biogeochemistry of the southwest Indian Ocean.The observations were made by researchers based at the National Oceanography Center, Southampton (NOCS) during a 2005 hydrographic survey south and east of Madagascar while aboard the royal research ship RRS Discovery. The fully analyzed results are published...

dea19a68c310956f42eda8df102f49821
2005-08-13 10:28:16

USC -- A USC oceanographer's long-term study shows that the marine food chain depends in large part on atmospheric nitrogen. The finding also demonstrates the oceans' massive absorption of greenhouse gas. A decade-long USC study has written the ending to a long-standing mystery: Where do marine organisms in the tropical oceans get the nitrogen they need to grow? In the process, the study also may help to explain how tons of carbon dioxide disappear into the ocean every day, slowing the...