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2014-06-16 13:04:56

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Parasitic worm genome and biology provides a solid basis for the development of new interventions Researchers have deduced essential biological and genetic information from the genome sequence of the whipworm, an intestinal parasitic worm that infects hundreds of millions of people in developing countries. This information acts as the foundation for the development of new strategies and treatments against this debilitating parasite. The whipworm is...

2005-06-16 11:25:00

A study of how the body expels parasitic worms has led to a surprising new discovery about the immune system that could help in the treatment of bowel cancer. Scientists investigating whipworms, parasites that infect one-fifth of the world's population as well as livestock and domestic animals, have discovered a new way that the body effectively eliminates the parasites. The University of Manchester research, published in the US journal Science, found the reason why some hosts were able to...


Latest Trichuris Reference Libraries

Trichuris suis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Trichuris suis is a species of whipworm that is classified within the Nematoda phylum. It can be found in warm tropical regions throughout the world but is rare in arid regions. Males reach an average body length between 1.1 and 1.5 inches, while females reach an average length between 2.3 and 3.1 inches. This species, and other members of the Trichuris genus, was given its common name because of its whip like appearance. The original definitive hosts of this species are pigs, but it is able...

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Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'