Quantcast

Latest Trihalomethane Stories

2011-03-16 14:19:42

Wealthy, well educated people who choose to drink bottled water rather than water from public supplies may be no less exposed to potentially cancer-causing water contaminants, according to new research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Environmental Health. As part of the EPICURO national bladder cancer study, researchers from all over Spain quizzed 1,270 individuals about their water use and consumption in an effort to discover whether social class has any bearing on exposure...

2008-08-05 15:00:35

By Tom Fontaine, Beaver County Times, Pa. Aug. 5--FINDLAY TWP. -- Tests of Pittsburgh International Airport's drinking water last month revealed the water had excessive levels of a chemical that can increase cancer risks and cause liver, kidney and central-nervous system problems if consumed over many years, airport and health officials said. The testing showed the airport's drinking water had an average level of 0.081 milligram of trihalomethanes per liter over the past year, said...

2008-08-02 03:00:20

By Bonnie Pfister, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Aug. 2--The economic downturn at Pittsburgh International Airport has created another adverse consequence: a buildup of potentially dangerous chemicals in the facility's drinking water. Airport and health officials said Friday the airport's water supply over the past year has exceeded legal levels for total trihalomethanes, or THMs, a by-product of chlorine or other chemicals used to disinfect water. Because of the dramatic slump in...

2008-07-11 18:00:18

By KAT HUGHES The city of Columbia received data this week from a recent round of tests of water in its distribution system, and the news was not good. Water tests near Prathersville showed that the average level of trihalomethanes has increased about 9 percent from its previous average, which was above standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency. Trihalomethanes are a carcinogenic byproduct formed when chlorine used to disinfect drinking water interacts with organic...

2005-10-25 12:46:23

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - There is no clearly safe level of exposure to four of the most common environmental toxins in the world, and more should be done to protect the public, researchers argue in a new report. The toxins in question -- lead, radon, tobacco smoke and byproducts of drinking-water disinfection -- are ubiquitous, and there is growing evidence that even low-level exposure can have health consequences, according to the report, published in the medical...

2005-08-16 09:35:00

NEW YORK -- Although some studies have suggested that certain chemical byproducts in tap water raise a woman's risk of miscarriage, new research suggests that the threat is small, if it exists at all. The chemicals in question are byproducts of the chlorination process used to kill disease-causing pathogens in the drinking-water supply. Some of these byproducts, including a group of chemicals called trihalomethanes, have been shown to cause cancer and reproductive problems in lab animals...

2005-07-29 14:50:00

CHAPEL HILL "“ Fears that chemical byproducts resulting from purifying drinking water with chlorine boost the chances that pregnant women will miscarry were not supported by the results of a major new study. If such threats exist at all, which is uncertain, they likely are modest, it concludes. The national study, directed by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientists, contrasts with earlier, less detailed work done in Northern California and published in 1998. That research...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.