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Latest Tummy time Stories

Laying Babies On Side Or Back Can Cause Flattened Skull
2013-07-08 12:48:07

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For parents, sometimes there's just no way to win. A new study has found that the practice of laying babies on their side or back to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) can often cause a flat spot to develop on a child's skull. According to the recent study of Canadian children, which was published in the journal Pediatrics, 46.6 percent of two- to three-month-old babies may have some type of "positional...

2011-10-17 11:49:13

New research reinforces the need for continued public education programs that encourage parents to place their infants to sleep in the supine (back) position in a safe crib or bassinet, to prevent an estimated 4,600 annual Sudden Unintended Infant Deaths (SUID), of which 50 percent are classified as Sudden Death Syndrome (SIDS). The abstract, "Retrospective Review of Sleeping Conditions in Infant Deaths in New Mexico," was presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National...

2010-12-04 00:00:38

RSLSteeper, one of the UK's leading providers of clinically effective prosthetics and orthotics services, has launched STAR@Steeperclinic, a new service based in Leeds designed specifically to help treat babies suffering from head shape abnormalities such as deformational plagiocephaly (flat head syndrome). (PRWeb UK) December 2, 2010 RSLSteeper, one of the UK's leading providers of clinically effective prosthetics and orthotics services, has launched STAR@Steeperclinic, a new service...

2010-06-16 13:09:00

SAN ANTONIO, June 16 /PRNewswire/ -- The STAR Cranial Center of Excellence, a specialized provider of treatment for infants with plagiocephaly and other head shape abnormalities, recently opened a new location in San Antonio. The Center currently also has offices in the Baltimore, Dallas and Orlando areas, and has treated thousands of infants with STARband® cranial remolding orthoses, also commonly referred to as cranial helmets or headbands. The new San Antonio...

2010-02-15 08:22:44

Researchers caution not to be alarmed; more study needed to determine if delays are persistent and significant In a new study, infants averaging six months of age who exhibited positional plagiocephaly (flat head syndrome) had lower scores than typical infants in observational tests used to evaluate cognitive and motor development. Positional or deformational plagiocephaly may occur when external forces shape an infant's skull while it is still soft and malleable, such as extended time spent...

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2008-10-07 06:40:00

Researchers reported on Monday that using a fan to circulate air actually lowered the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in a study of nearly 500 babies. Experts recommend the best way to prevent SIDS is to put babies on their backs to sleep. They also say to use a firm mattress, remove toys and pillows from cribs, and keep infants from getting too warm. Over a decade such practices helped slash U.S. SIDS deaths by more than half from about 2,100 in 2003. However, SIDS remains the leading...

2008-10-07 06:00:13

By Liz Szabo Fans may reduce the risk of SIDS, or sudden infant death syndrome, a study shows. Babies who slept in a room with a fan were 72% less likely to die from SIDS, according to a study released today from Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. The study included interviews with the mothers of 185 infants who died from SIDS and the mothers of 312 other babies. Fans offered even more protection in warm rooms where temperatures were over 69 degrees. It's possible...

2008-07-30 12:01:17

A new survey of more than 400 pediatric physical, occupational and speech therapists confirms what early childhood medical professionals have been observing for years: two-thirds of therapists reported seeing a rise in Early Motor Delays in infants in the past six years, and those who saw an increase said that lack of tummy time while awake is the number-one contributor to the escalation in cases. An Early Motor Delay occurs when a child isn't able to meet critical physical milestones in the...

2008-07-01 03:00:38

Having babies sleep on their backs reduces Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, but losing out on tummy time hurts their muscles, U.S. researchers say. With babies sleeping on their backs, they miss out on the 12 hours of tummy time they used to get during sleep. As a result, many babies don't get the stretching and strengthening of the back and neck muscles they need. This can lead to early motor delay, said the Pathways Awareness Medical Round Table, a group of pediatricians, surgeons, physical...

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2004-12-11 11:36:12

Those lacking experience sleeping on stomachs more prone HealthDayNews -- A baby's lack of experience sleeping on his or her stomach may be linked to an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a new study claims. The study, conducted by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, concluded that babies who never sleep on their stomachs don't learn behaviors that reduce their risk of SIDS. The findings appear in the December issue of Pediatrics. "The...