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Latest Tumor suppressor genes Stories

2012-05-07 20:30:41

Such deletions could confer survival advantage on tumors, a challenge to '2-hit theory' of tumor suppressor action Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have amassed strong experimental evidence implying that commonly occurring large chromosomal deletions that are seen in many cancer types contain areas harboring multiple functionally linked genes whose loss, they posit, confers a survival advantage on growing tumors. Looking...

2012-04-03 09:16:18

Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human tumor virus and an etiological agent for Kaposi's sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). PELs are aggressive lymphomas with reported median survival time shorter than six months after diagnosis. Researchers at the University of Helsinki discovered that spontaneous induction of KSHV lytic replication in tumors drastically attenuated the p53-dependent apoptotic response not only to a targeted therapy (Nutlin-3) but also to genotoxic...

2012-03-26 22:21:05

Team discovers mechanism for destroying particular cancer cells An international team of scientists has announced a new advance in the ability to target and destroy certain cancer cells. A group led by the University of Leicester has shown that particular cancer cells are especially sensitive to a protein called p21. This protein usually forces normal and cancer cells to stop dividing but it was recently shown that in some cases it can also kill cancer cells. However, scientists have...

2012-03-14 09:37:26

The authors, from Oscar Fernandez Capetillo's group, have identified this double-edged property in the gene Chk1, an established tumor suppressor Can a gene simultaneously protect against cancer and favor its growth? Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre have discovered a gene with this double-edged property and suspect there may be many more that share it. In the words of Oscar Fernandez Capetillo, head of the group responsible for the study, this gene "can be both...

2012-03-08 06:12:15

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — We dream of a world where we can eat whatever we like and not worry about the consequences, like weight gain and health issues, and now we might be a step closer. A new study shows mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow and also live longer. In a case study, researchers studied a tumor suppressor commonly lost in human cancers. Mice were given an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene, known as Pten. Not only...

2012-03-06 23:40:22

This result, obtained after five years' research, is published in leading journal Cell Metabolism. The authors, led by Manuel Serrano (CNIO), believe it will open the door to new therapeutic options not only against cancer, but against obesity and even the ageing process. The team has also demonstrated that a synthetic compound developed in-house produces the same anti-obesity benefits in animals as the study gene. Their findings add new weight to a hypothesis that is gaining currency...

2012-03-06 23:05:23

In a perfect world, we could eat to our heart's content without sacrificing our health and good looks, and now it appears that maybe we can. Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to the report in the March issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either. One of the animals' youthful secrets is hyperactive brown...

2012-02-28 11:49:48

UT MD Anderson scientists find molecular path of protein associated with hard-to-treat cancers A protein abundantly found in treatment-resistant cancers holds an important tumor-suppressor out of the cell nucleus, where it would normally detect DNA damage and force defective cells to kill themselves, a team of scientists reports in the current Cancer Cell. "Overexpression of Aurora Kinase-A in tumors has been correlated with resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapy, but we haven't known...


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