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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Tumor suppressor genes Stories

2012-03-06 23:05:23

In a perfect world, we could eat to our heart's content without sacrificing our health and good looks, and now it appears that maybe we can. Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to the report in the March issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either. One of the animals' youthful secrets is hyperactive brown...

2012-02-28 11:49:48

UT MD Anderson scientists find molecular path of protein associated with hard-to-treat cancers A protein abundantly found in treatment-resistant cancers holds an important tumor-suppressor out of the cell nucleus, where it would normally detect DNA damage and force defective cells to kill themselves, a team of scientists reports in the current Cancer Cell. "Overexpression of Aurora Kinase-A in tumors has been correlated with resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapy, but we haven't known...

2012-02-16 15:05:52

Yale researchers have discovered how the "guardian of the genome'' oversees quality control in the production of sperm – and perhaps in many other cells as well. The research published online Feb. 16 in the journal Current Biology opens up the potential of developing new forms of birth control and fertility treatment – and even new ways to combat many forms of cancer. Sperm and other cells go through a sort of inspection process triggered by a key regulatory gene, p53, which...

2012-01-26 12:57:23

Researchers at Queen´s University have identified a possible cause for the loss of a tumour suppressor gene (known as PTEN) that can lead to the development of more aggressive forms of prostate cancer. “This discovery gives us a greater understanding of how aggressive prostate cancer develops because we now have some insight into the mechanism by which the PTEN gene is destroyed,” says Jeremy Squire, a professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine....

2012-01-25 04:45:31

Among women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, patients having a germline (gene change in a reproductive cell that could be passed to offspring) mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes was associated with improved 5-year overall survival, with BRCA2 carriers having the best prognosis, according to a study in the January 25 issue of JAMA. "Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the strongest known genetic risk factors for both breast and epithelial ovarian...

2012-01-23 22:07:58

Metastasizing cancer cells often express integrins that provide better traction. A new study in The Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org) reveals how a lipid-converting enzyme helps the cells mobilize these integrins. Adhesive integrin proteins continually cycle to and from the cell surface. Invasive cancer cells that carry mutant forms of the tumor suppressor p53 often bias the process, increasing the recycling of a particular integrin that offers a better grip on the fibronectin fibers...

2012-01-21 00:11:46

The expression of p53 and Mdm2 is closely related. In an article published this week in the Cancel Cell review, Robin Fahraeus and his collaborators from Inserm Unit 940 ("Therapeutic Targets for Cancer"), demonstrate that cellular response to DNA damage requires involvement from the protein kinase ATM so that Mdm2 can positively or negatively control protein p53. Much focus is placed on protein p53 in cancer research. Discovered in 1979, p53 precisely regulates cell proliferation and...

2012-01-19 14:49:10

Cholesterol-lowering statins seem to keep breast cancer at bay in some patients. Now researchers reporting in the January 20th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, provide clues about how statins might yield those unexpected benefits. The findings also suggest that mutations in a single gene could be used to identify tumors likely to respond to statin therapy. "The data raises the possibility that we might identify subsets of patients whose tumors may respond to statins,"...

2012-01-19 13:50:35

Inherited mutation links exploding chromosomes to cancer An inherited mutation in a gene known as the guardian of the genome is likely the link between exploding chromosomes and some particularly aggressive types of cancer, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) and the University Hospital, all in Heidelberg, Germany, have discovered. Their study, published online today in Cell, also presents the first whole genome sequence...

2012-01-09 19:55:48

A well-known protein complex responsible for controlling how DNA is expressed plays a previously unsuspected role in preventing pancreatic cancer, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Technological advances in the way researchers can compare normal and tumor DNA showed that the gene for at least one subunit of the multi-subunit SWI/SNF protein complex was either deleted, mutated or rearranged in about a third of the 70 human pancreatic cancers that the...