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Latest Tumor suppressor genes Stories

2012-06-21 02:14:41

A molecule widely believed to fight many forms of cancer actually helps deadly thyroid tumors grow, and cancer therapies now being tested in humans might boost the activity of this newly revealed bad guy, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida say. Their findings are published online this month in the Journal of Cell Science. The study found that in anaplastic thyroid cancer, the Forkhead transcription factor, FOXO3a, is not the helpful tumor suppressor everyone thought it was, but,...

2012-06-11 21:37:06

Mutated tumor suppressor gene p53 leads to better results Presence of normal p53, a tumor suppressor gene, instead of a mutated version, makes breast cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin less effective. The preclinical study led by MD Anderson scientists was published today in the journal Cancer Cell. The research, which challenges the existing paradigm, is another step closer to personalized cancer medicine for breast cancer. "It's really important to understand the genetic defects...

2012-05-14 22:39:36

A new study describes a compound that selectively kills cancer cells by restoring the structure and function of one of the most commonly mutated proteins in human cancer, the "tumor suppressor" p53. The research, published by Cell Press in the May 15th issue of the journal Cancer Cell, uses a novel, computer based strategy to identify potential anti-cancer drugs, including one that targets the third most common p53 mutation in human cancer, p53-R175H. The number of new cancer patients...

2012-05-09 21:16:34

Whole-genome sequencing of 25 tumors confirms role of sun damage while revealing new genetic alterations Melanoma — the deadliest and most aggressive form of skin cancer — has long been linked to time spent in the sun. Now a team led by scientists from the Broad Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has sequenced the whole genomes of 25 metastatic melanoma tumors, confirming the role of chronic sun exposure and revealing new genetic changes important in tumor formation....

2012-05-09 19:25:50

When collaborators led by those at Baylor College of Medicine and Stanford University School of Medicine sought to unravel the mysterious role of the enzyme SIRT7 in the cell, they discovered a saboteur that uses other molecules to maintain tumor cells in their cancer state, suppressing the systems that are supposed to prevent that malignant transformation. A report on their work appears online today in the journal Nature. "This is a very bad gene," said Dr. Wei Li, associate professor in...

2012-05-07 20:30:41

Such deletions could confer survival advantage on tumors, a challenge to '2-hit theory' of tumor suppressor action Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have amassed strong experimental evidence implying that commonly occurring large chromosomal deletions that are seen in many cancer types contain areas harboring multiple functionally linked genes whose loss, they posit, confers a survival advantage on growing tumors. Looking...

2012-04-03 09:16:18

Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human tumor virus and an etiological agent for Kaposi's sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). PELs are aggressive lymphomas with reported median survival time shorter than six months after diagnosis. Researchers at the University of Helsinki discovered that spontaneous induction of KSHV lytic replication in tumors drastically attenuated the p53-dependent apoptotic response not only to a targeted therapy (Nutlin-3) but also to genotoxic...

2012-03-26 22:21:05

Team discovers mechanism for destroying particular cancer cells An international team of scientists has announced a new advance in the ability to target and destroy certain cancer cells. A group led by the University of Leicester has shown that particular cancer cells are especially sensitive to a protein called p21. This protein usually forces normal and cancer cells to stop dividing but it was recently shown that in some cases it can also kill cancer cells. However, scientists have...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.