Quantcast

Latest Tumors Stories

2012-05-15 09:36:04

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a genetic test that can accurately predict whether the most common form of eye cancer will spread to other parts of the body, particularly the liver. In 459 patients with ocular melanoma at 12 centers in the United States and Canada, the researchers found the test could successfully classify tumors more than 97 percent of the time. The study will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Ophthalmology,...

2012-05-14 22:12:55

Pediatric brain tumors preserve specific characteristics of the normal cells from which they originate — a previously unknown circumstance with ramifications for how tumor cells respond to treatment. This has been shown by Uppsala researcher Fredrik Swartling together with colleagues in the U.S., Canada and England in a study that was published today in the distinguished journal Cancer Cell. Every year, 80-90 children in Sweden are afflicted with brain tumors, a serious form of...

2012-05-09 21:16:34

Whole-genome sequencing of 25 tumors confirms role of sun damage while revealing new genetic alterations Melanoma — the deadliest and most aggressive form of skin cancer — has long been linked to time spent in the sun. Now a team led by scientists from the Broad Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has sequenced the whole genomes of 25 metastatic melanoma tumors, confirming the role of chronic sun exposure and revealing new genetic changes important in tumor formation....

2012-05-08 09:43:38

The cells that slough off from a cancerous tumor into the bloodstream are a genetically diverse bunch, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have found. Some have genes turned on that give them the potential to lodge themselves in new places, helping a cancer spread between organs. Others have completely different patterns of gene expression and might be more benign, or less likely to survive in a new tissue. Some cells may even express genes that could predict their response to...

2012-05-07 20:30:41

Such deletions could confer survival advantage on tumors, a challenge to '2-hit theory' of tumor suppressor action Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have amassed strong experimental evidence implying that commonly occurring large chromosomal deletions that are seen in many cancer types contain areas harboring multiple functionally linked genes whose loss, they posit, confers a survival advantage on growing tumors. Looking...

2012-05-03 15:47:05

They build "spaghetti models" of cancer progression similar to meteorologists' models for predicting hurricane paths Using mathematical models, researchers in the Integrated Mathematical Oncology (IMO) program at Moffitt Cancer Center are focusing their research on the interaction between the tumor and its microenvironment and the "selective forces" in that microenvironment that play a role in the growth and evolution of cancer. According to Alexander R. A. Anderson, Ph.D., chair of...

2012-05-03 15:10:40

Presentations at the 4th IMPAKT Breast Cancer Conference New findings presented at Europe's leading breast cancer translational research conference this year shed new light on the many biological differences between individual breast cancers. Focused on the biological features that make tumors more or less sensitive to important therapies, the new studies will help doctors make crucial choices about the most appropriate treatment for millions of patients. "Despite major advances in...

2012-05-02 20:54:25

UCSF Visualization Shows Why Immune System Fails to Kill Tumors in Mice A pioneering approach to imaging breast cancer in mice has revealed new clues about why the human immune system often fails to attack tumors and keep cancer in check. This observation, by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), may help to reveal new approaches to cancer immunotherapy. Published in the journal Cancer Cell last month, the work shows that the body's natural defenses trip over...

2012-05-01 21:14:22

Abdominal tumors involving both roots of the celiac and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) are deemed unresectable by conventional surgical methods, as removal would cause necrosis of the organs that are supplied by those blood vessels. A case report published in the journal American Journal of Transplantation presents a novel surgical technique that enables surgeons to remove tumors that are unresectable by the usual surgical techniques. Led by Tomoaki Kato, MD, FACS, of Columbia...

2012-04-26 09:30:40

Worrywarts, fidgety folk and the naturally nervy may have a real cause for concern: accelerated cancer. In a new study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, anxiety-prone mice developed more severe cancer then their calm counterparts. The study, to be published online April 25 in PLoS ONE, found that after hairless mice were dosed with ultraviolet rays, the nervous ones – with a penchant for reticence and risk aversion – developed more tumors and...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
Related