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Latest Tumors Stories

2012-06-04 17:41:18

Pared-down nucleic acid nanoparticle poses less risk of side effects, offers better targeting. Using a technique known as “nucleic acid origami,” chemical engineers have built tiny particles made out of DNA and RNA that can deliver snippets of RNA directly to tumors, turning off genes expressed in cancer cells. To achieve this type of gene shutdown, known as RNA interference, many researchers have tried – with some success – to deliver RNA with particles made...

Sodium Retention And Blood Pressure Increased By Common Genetic Mutation
2012-05-30 08:43:57

Nearly 40 percent of the small adrenal tumors that cause big problems with high blood pressure share a genetic mutation that causes patients to retain too much sodium, researchers report. The study of 47 human, benign adrenal gland tumors also showed a mutation of the gene KCNJ5 is twice as likely to occur in women — 71 versus 29 percent — as it points to potential new treatments for some patients who don't respond to current hypertension regimens, said Dr. William E. Rainey,...

2012-05-28 19:18:26

Discovery of mutation ends UCLA doctor's 20-year quest The Caterpillar got down off the mushroom and crawled away in the grass, remarking as it went, 'One side will make you grow taller, and the other side will make you grow shorter.' -Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll UCLA geneticists have identified the mutation responsible for IMAGe syndrome, a rare disorder that stunts infants' growth. The twist? The mutation occurs on the same gene that causes Beckwith-Wiedemann...

2012-05-18 23:51:29

3-pronged study reveals high response rate in other advanced melanoma patients and activity in multiple cancers An experimental drug targeting a common mutation in melanoma successfully shrank tumors that spread to the brain in nine out of 10 patients in part of an international phase I clinical trial report in the May 18 issue of The Lancet. The drug dabrafenib, which targets the Val600 BRAF mutation that is active in half of melanoma cases, also cut the size of tumors in 25 of 36...

2012-05-16 11:20:03

Cell surface protein blows potent cells' cover; targeted drug works in preclinical tests Breast cancer stem cells wear a cell surface protein that is part nametag and part bull's eye, identifying them as potent tumor-generating cells and flagging their vulnerability to a drug, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report online in Journal of Clinical Investigation. "We've discovered a single marker for breast cancer stem cells and also found that it's...

2012-05-15 09:36:04

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a genetic test that can accurately predict whether the most common form of eye cancer will spread to other parts of the body, particularly the liver. In 459 patients with ocular melanoma at 12 centers in the United States and Canada, the researchers found the test could successfully classify tumors more than 97 percent of the time. The study will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Ophthalmology,...

2012-05-14 22:12:55

Pediatric brain tumors preserve specific characteristics of the normal cells from which they originate — a previously unknown circumstance with ramifications for how tumor cells respond to treatment. This has been shown by Uppsala researcher Fredrik Swartling together with colleagues in the U.S., Canada and England in a study that was published today in the distinguished journal Cancer Cell. Every year, 80-90 children in Sweden are afflicted with brain tumors, a serious form of...

2012-05-09 21:16:34

Whole-genome sequencing of 25 tumors confirms role of sun damage while revealing new genetic alterations Melanoma — the deadliest and most aggressive form of skin cancer — has long been linked to time spent in the sun. Now a team led by scientists from the Broad Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has sequenced the whole genomes of 25 metastatic melanoma tumors, confirming the role of chronic sun exposure and revealing new genetic changes important in tumor formation....

2012-05-08 09:43:38

The cells that slough off from a cancerous tumor into the bloodstream are a genetically diverse bunch, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have found. Some have genes turned on that give them the potential to lodge themselves in new places, helping a cancer spread between organs. Others have completely different patterns of gene expression and might be more benign, or less likely to survive in a new tissue. Some cells may even express genes that could predict their response to...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.