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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 9:20 EDT

Latest tumour Stories

2010-11-19 12:32:49

Phase I trial shows first drug to inhibit ALK-1 receptor is safe and effective Researchers have found that a newly developed drug, which is aimed at a particular receptor involved in the development of blood vessels that sustain tumour growth, is active in patients with advanced cancers and, in some cases, has halted the progress of the disease. The drug, ACE-041, targets a different molecular pathway to other anti-angiogenesis drugs and may provide a new option to treat cancer. Results from...

2010-11-18 12:52:17

Scientists in Germany have developed a way of smuggling an anti-cancer drug past the protective blood-brain barrier and into brain tumours and metastases using a nanocarrier "“ a tiny capsule specially designed to pass through cell membranes and deliver its anti-cancer drug to the cancer cell. The blood-brain barrier is formed by a network of closely sealed endothelial cells in the brain's capillaries, and it expresses a high level of proteins that pump foreign molecules away from the...

2010-11-17 13:40:41

Researchers have shown that point mutations "“ mis-spellings in a single letter of genetic code "“ that drive the onset and growth of cancer cells can be detected successfully in advanced ovarian cancer using a technique called OncoMap. The finding opens the way for personalised medicine in which every patient could have their tumour screened, specific mutations identified, and the appropriate drug chosen to target the mutation and halt the growth of their cancer. Using mass...

2010-11-09 14:45:53

A fundamental principle of medicine is: "first, do no harm." However, for doctors who treat breast cancer, this is easier said than done. Every year, almost 22,000 Canadian women are diagnosed with breast cancer "” their treatment usually involves surgery to remove a tumour and then chemotherapy to reduce the risk of cancer returning. But studies show that for most patients with early stage breast cancer, chemotherapy following surgery is totally unnecessary and therefore does more harm...

2010-11-04 18:07:35

New research could lead to improved vaccines for cancerous tumors Researchers at the University of Cambridge hope to revolutionise cancer therapy after discovering one of the reasons why many previous attempts to harness the immune system to treat cancerous tumours have failed. New research, published today in the journal Science, reveals that a type of stromal cell found in many cancers which expresses fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP), plays a major role in suppressing the immune...

2010-10-27 20:40:36

Pancreatic cancer genomes show remarkable mutation effects In new research published today, researchers uncover evolution in action in cancer cells. They show the forces of evolution in pancreatic tumours mean that not only is cancer genetically different between different patients, but each new focus of cancer spread within a patient has acquired distinct mutations. Effectively, ten different foci of cancer spread are ten different, but related, tumours. The complexity of pancreatic cancer...

2010-10-19 16:12:34

Survival rates of the world's most common cancer might soon be increased with a new vitamin E treatment which could significantly reduce tumour regrowth. Queensland University of Technology (QUT) prostate cancer researchers are leading the fight against a disease which kills 3000 Australian men a year. Dr Patrick Ling, whose research will be a centrepiece of the new $354 million Translational Research Institute (TRI) when it opens in Brisbane, is leading a team of researchers who have...

2010-09-28 17:53:06

Australian and American scientists have found a way of shrinking tumours in certain cancers "“ a finding that provides hope for new treatments. The cancers in question are those caused by a new class of genes known as "ËœmicroRNAs', produced by parts of the genome that, until recently, were dismissed as "Ëœjunk DNA'. While much is still unknown about microRNAs, it is clear that they can interfere with how our genes are "Ëœread'. The current finding...

2010-08-09 14:31:46

PTB physicists want to improve tumour therapy by heat treatment in cooperation with biomedical physicians from Jena Those who have to fight a powerful enemy must look for allies. This is why physicists from different scientific fields have decided to cooperate with biomedical physicians in order to place the fight against cancer through heat treatment by means of magnetic nanoparticles on a solid, scientific basis. It is the objective of the cooperation to improve the success of the therapy....

2010-08-02 16:05:20

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers in Melbourne, Australia, have made a discovery that has upended scientists' understanding of programmed cell death and its role in tumour formation. Programmed cell death, also called apoptosis, is an important process in human biology as it removes unwanted and damaged cells from our bodies. This process protects us against cancer development and autoimmune disease. The research team's discovery, led by Professor Andreas Strasser from the...