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Latest tumour Stories

2010-11-04 18:07:35

New research could lead to improved vaccines for cancerous tumors Researchers at the University of Cambridge hope to revolutionise cancer therapy after discovering one of the reasons why many previous attempts to harness the immune system to treat cancerous tumours have failed. New research, published today in the journal Science, reveals that a type of stromal cell found in many cancers which expresses fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP), plays a major role in suppressing the immune...

2010-10-27 20:40:36

Pancreatic cancer genomes show remarkable mutation effects In new research published today, researchers uncover evolution in action in cancer cells. They show the forces of evolution in pancreatic tumours mean that not only is cancer genetically different between different patients, but each new focus of cancer spread within a patient has acquired distinct mutations. Effectively, ten different foci of cancer spread are ten different, but related, tumours. The complexity of pancreatic cancer...

2010-10-19 16:12:34

Survival rates of the world's most common cancer might soon be increased with a new vitamin E treatment which could significantly reduce tumour regrowth. Queensland University of Technology (QUT) prostate cancer researchers are leading the fight against a disease which kills 3000 Australian men a year. Dr Patrick Ling, whose research will be a centrepiece of the new $354 million Translational Research Institute (TRI) when it opens in Brisbane, is leading a team of researchers who have...

2010-09-28 17:53:06

Australian and American scientists have found a way of shrinking tumours in certain cancers "“ a finding that provides hope for new treatments. The cancers in question are those caused by a new class of genes known as "ËœmicroRNAs', produced by parts of the genome that, until recently, were dismissed as "Ëœjunk DNA'. While much is still unknown about microRNAs, it is clear that they can interfere with how our genes are "Ëœread'. The current finding...

2010-08-09 14:31:46

PTB physicists want to improve tumour therapy by heat treatment in cooperation with biomedical physicians from Jena Those who have to fight a powerful enemy must look for allies. This is why physicists from different scientific fields have decided to cooperate with biomedical physicians in order to place the fight against cancer through heat treatment by means of magnetic nanoparticles on a solid, scientific basis. It is the objective of the cooperation to improve the success of the therapy....

2010-08-02 16:05:20

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers in Melbourne, Australia, have made a discovery that has upended scientists' understanding of programmed cell death and its role in tumour formation. Programmed cell death, also called apoptosis, is an important process in human biology as it removes unwanted and damaged cells from our bodies. This process protects us against cancer development and autoimmune disease. The research team's discovery, led by Professor Andreas Strasser from the...

2010-07-01 14:19:27

UAB researchers decode a cascade of signals within tumour cells activated by olive oil The researchers decoded a complete cascade of signals within breast tumour cells activated by virgin olive oil, and concluded that benefits include decrease in the activity of the oncogene p21Ras, changes in protein signaling pathways, stimulation of tumour cell death and prevention of DNA damage. The study was carried out in an experimental model and researchers have already begun a new study with human...

2010-06-11 13:13:06

Reprogramming immune system cells to produce natural killer cells for cancer A team of researchers has developed a method to produce cells that kill tumour cells in the lab and prevent tumours forming in mouse models of cancer. Although the current work is in cells and mouse, if the research transfers to human biology, the new type of cell could be a new source for cell-based anticancer therapies. The cells were produced by knocking out a single gene essential in the pathways of development...

2010-06-11 01:11:06

The research demonstrates that p53 is activated to control the creation of ova and spermatozoa Protein p53 is known as the guardian of the genome since it is basic for the genome's integrity by preventing the accumulation of mutations originating either by the cell's own mechanisms or by the action of external agents. The protein becomes activated in response to specific signals such as breaks in DNA. This activation implies a slowing of the cell's cycle which allows it to repair itself from...

2010-06-07 13:46:59

Protein p53 is also activated to control the creation of ova and spermatozoids Protein 53 is very important in protecting against cancer given that it prevents cancer-causing mutations from accumulating and its inactivation is closely linked to the proliferation of tumour cells. UAB lecturer Ignasi Roig participated in the study. Formed by an international research team, the study served to discover that this protein played an unexpected physiological role: it also becomes activated during...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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