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Latest Tundra Stories

2008-08-08 18:00:21

By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg TOOLIK FIELD STATION, Alaska - Beyond the Arctic Circle, teams of scientists measure widening slumps as ice melts beneath the tundra. They scuff through tussocks blackened by unexpected fires, and search for fish in drought-depleted streams. The researchers are taking the pulse of a warming earth in a landscape supremely adapted to cold, one that may be an early- warning zone for lands far south. "It's not just an Alaska thing," said Syndonia "Donie" Bret-...

2008-08-07 12:05:00

U.S.-led scientists say they have found the last traces of tundra that grew in interior Antarctica before temperatures dropped millions of years ago. The National Science Foundation-funded researchers said an abrupt, dramatic climate cooling during an approximately 200,000-year span -- a relatively brief period of geological time -- occurred about 14 million years ago, forcing the extinction of tundra plants and insects and transforming the Antarctic interior into a perpetual deeply frozen...

2008-08-03 03:00:13

TOOLIK LAKE, Alaska _ Ground here that for tens of thousands of years was frozen solid is terra firma no more. Across the tundra and coast of the Arctic Ocean, land is caving in. Soils loosed by freshly thawed earth set off a new era of rot, and of bloom _ dumping a bonanza of nutrients into a top-of-the-world environment that swirls from months of midnight sun to deep-freeze dark. Will nature channel the nourishment of this soil into a great flowering of plant life that soaks up...

2008-07-22 09:00:00

TOOLIK LAKE, Alaska -- Scientist Anne Hershey paddled a small inflatable raft across an arctic lake, pausing in her stroke to consider how the melting permafrost caused a landslide of mud and sediment spilling down the bank into the water. Since the bank collapsed two years ago, the water has grown cloudy with sediment, providing scientists a natural laboratory for studying how warmer temperatures may play out in ecosystems far and near. Global air and water temperatures are inching...

2008-07-18 06:00:29

By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg, The Sacramento Bee, Calif. Jul. 18--TOOLIK FIELD STATION, Alaska -- Beyond the Arctic Circle, teams of scientists measure widening slumps as ice melts beneath the tundra. They scuff through tussocks blackened by unexpected fires, and search for fish in drought-depleted streams. The researchers are taking the pulse of a warming Earth in a landscape supremely adapted to cold, one that may be an early-warning zone for lands far south. "It's not just an Alaska...

2008-07-15 09:00:45

DIMPLE LAKE, Alaska _ The Arctic is burning. It long has, of course, but now with greater regularity and more ferocity. Splinters of lightning crackle on the tundra, setting ablaze runaway fires that toast the landscape black. Around this remote pond deep in the Arctic Circle, the ground is a singed sponge dotted with charred clumps of tussock grass. Nearby an emerald carpet covers nearly every inch of tundra in one shade or another of green, as it typically does for the 300 or more years...

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2008-06-10 14:35:00

The rate of climate warming over northern Alaska, Canada, and Russia could more than triple during periods of rapid sea ice loss, according to a new study led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The findings raise concerns about the thawing of permafrost, or permanently frozen soil, and the potential consequences for sensitive ecosystems, human infrastructure, and the release of additional greenhouse gases."Our study suggests that, if sea-ice continues to contract rapidly...

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2007-10-17 21:35:00

WASHINGTON -- The Arctic is under increasing stress from warming temperatures as shrubs colonize the tundra, changing wildlife habitat and local climate conditions, researchers said Wednesday. Sea ice fell well below the previous record, caribou are declining in many areas and permafrost is melting, according to the annual update of the State of the Arctic report. "The bottom line is we are seeing some rapid changes in the Arctic," said Richard Spinrad, assistant administrator for oceanic and...

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2007-03-05 16:15:00

Forests of spruce trees and shrubs in parts of northern Canada are taking over what were once tundra landscapes--forcing out the species that lived there. This shift can happen at a much faster speed than scientists originally thought, according to a new University of Alberta study that adds to the growing body of evidence on the effects of climate change. The boundary, or treeline, between forest and tundra ecosystems is a prominent landscape feature in both Arctic and mountain...

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2006-02-07 09:47:30

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Scientists on Monday painted a gloomy picture of the effects of global warming on the Arctic, warning of melting ocean ice, rising oceans, thawed permafrost and forests susceptible to bugs and fire. "A lot of the stories you read make it sound like there's uncertainty," said Jonathan Overpeck, a professor of geosciences at the University of Arizona. "There's not uncertainty." The questions scientists continue to address, he said after his presentation at the Alaska...


Latest Tundra Reference Libraries

Taiga
2013-04-19 18:21:46

Taiga, or otherwise known as boreal forest, is a biome that is characterized by coniferous forests made up mostly of spruces, larches, and pines. The taiga is the world’s largest terrestrial biome. In North America, it covers most of inland Canada and Alaska as well as portions of the extreme northern continental United States and is known as the Northwoods. It covers most of Sweden, Finland, much of Norway, lowland/coastal areas of Iceland, much of Russia, northern Kazakhstan, northern...

Antarctica
2013-02-18 10:15:24

Antarctica is the Earths southernmost continent; it contains the geographic South Pole. It’s situated in the Antarctic area of the Southern Hemisphere, almost completely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is bordered by the Southern Ocean. It’s the fifth-largest continent at 5.4 million sq miles. On average, it is the driest, coldest, and windiest continent as well as having the highest average elevation of all the continents. Considered a desert, the annual precipitation is only 8...

Reindeer Moss, Cladonia rangiferina
2005-06-02 10:18:18

Reindeer moss is a moss belonging to the family Cladoniaceae. It grows in both temperate and cold climate areas. It has had great economical importance, since it is the main fodder for reindeers. It can also be used in the making of aquavit and is sometimes used as decoration in glass windows. Reindeer moss is actually another name for reindeer lichen. This lichen is found in the Alpine tundra and can survive in the cold. Image Caption: Reindeer Moss photographed in White Oak Mountain,...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.