Quantcast
Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 0:16 EDT

Latest Tuojiangosaurus Stories

2011-05-26 16:55:00

Chinasaurs Exhibit and Sea Rex IMAX® Film Open May 26 for short summer run at Museum of Nature & Science DALLAS, May 26, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Museum of Nature & Science is launching a double dinosaur deal that offers a comprehensive look at the Mesozoic Era, through the opening of a new dinosaur exhibit, Chinasaurs, and accompanying IMAX® film, Sea Rex: Journey to a Prehistoric World. Both open May 26 at the Museum's Fair Park...


Latest Tuojiangosaurus Reference Libraries

45_feac9f457feeb5ade5b94a378c5a16a8
2011-02-28 13:50:20

Wuerhosaurus is a genus of stegosaurid dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Period of what is now China. It was one of the last genera of stegosaurs known to survive, since most others died out during the Late Jurassic Period. The type species, W. homheni, was described by Dong Zhiming in 1973 from the Tugulu Group in Xinjiang, western China. The specimen is known from a fragmentary skeleton lacking a skull. A second individual, W. ordosensis, which was found in the Ejinhoro Formation in...

45_ed8e2eadf49fc7fc544cbb4296b20031
2010-12-14 23:04:00

Tuojiangosaurus, meaning "Tuo River lizard," is a genus of stegosaurid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period. It was found in the Upper Shaximiao Formation of what is now Sichuan Province, China. The type species, T. multispinus (which is also the only known species) was named in 1977, based on two specimens. A mounted skeleton of T. multispinus is on display at the Municipal Museum of Chongqing in China. A mounted cast is also on display at the Natural history Museum in London....

0_1457424f2a8218dd4fef9f83817264f3
2010-02-03 14:32:40

Kentrosaurus, meaning "pointed lizard", is a genus of stegosaur dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period of what is now Tanzania. It is related to the better known Stegosaurus of North America. It was discovered in the Tendaguru Formation from the Kimmeridgian stage from 156 to 151 million years ago. It was first described by Edwin Hennig in 1915. The type species is K. aethiopicus. It is currently the only known species, however, fossil fragments discovered in a bone bed in North America, may...

More Articles (3 articles) »