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Latest Type II supernova Stories

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2009-04-14 10:15:00

Scientists have developed a new explanation for how youthful type Ia supernovae are formed. Dr. Bo Wang and colleagues from the Yunnan Observatory of the Chinese Academy of Sciences created a new model that links the formation of type Ia supernovae to the transfer of a material from a helium star to a white dwarf companion. White dwarves are dense remnants of stars like the Sun. Scientists theorize that these white dwarves borrow matter from a nearby star. Once the mass of the remnant star...

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2009-03-23 07:35:00

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has identified a star that was one million times brighter than the sun before it exploded as a supernova in 2005. According to current theories of stellar evolution, the star should not have self-destructed so early in its life. "This might mean that we are fundamentally wrong about the evolution of massive stars, and that theories need revising," says Avishay Gal-Yam of the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. The doomed star, which is estimated to...

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2009-03-20 08:05:00

Where do supernovae come from? Astronomers have long believed they were exploding stars, but by analyzing a series of images, researchers from the Dark Cosmology Centre at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen and from Queens University, Belfast have proven that two dying red supergiant stars produced supernovae. The results are published in the prestigious scientific journal, Science. A star is a large ball of hot gas and in its incredibly hot interior hydrogen atoms combine to...

2008-01-10 16:15:00

The Gemini South Multi-Object Spectograph (GMOS) recently captured a dramatic image of a vast cloud complex named DEM L316 located in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The peanut-shaped nebula appears to be a single object, but the latest research indicates that it is really comprised of two distinct gas and dust clouds formed by different types of supernova explosions.The new image reveals the intricate tendrils of gas and dust located in the remnants of the stellar explosions that created the...

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2008-01-10 08:57:23

The Gemini South Multi-Object Spectograph (GMOS) recently captured a dramatic image of a vast cloud complex named DEM L316 located in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The peanut-shaped nebula appears to be a single object, but the latest research indicates that it is really comprised of two distinct gas and dust clouds formed by different types of supernova explosions. The new image reveals the intricate tendrils of gas and dust located in the remnants of the stellar explosions that created the...

26d28508d9f5022b0b28f03d4c990a951
2007-02-24 18:20:00

Today, February 24th, is the 20th anniversary of the discovery of Supernova 1987A (SN1987A), the most famous supernova of our time. We asked Dick McCray, one of the foremost authorities on the outburst and its aftermath, whether SN1987A has become a supernova remnant, or are we still observing a supernova. "It's a bit like the question of whether Pluto should be called a planet, except that people won't feel as passionate about the matter," McCray responded, and then added, "Maybe it's...

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2006-08-30 16:35:00

Unusual Gamma-Ray Burst Studied in Detail Astronomers, using ESO's Very Large Telescope, have for the first time made the link between an X-ray flash and a supernova. Such flashes are the little siblings of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and this discovery suggests the existence of a population of events less luminous than 'classical' GRBs, but possibly much more numerous. "This extends the GRB-supernova connection to X-ray flashes and fainter supernovae, implying a common origin," said Elena Pian,...

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2006-06-10 09:40:00

When the universe was only 700 million years old, some of its galaxies were already filled with lots of dust. But where did all of this dust come from? Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope think they may have found the source in type II supernovae, the violent explosions of the universe's most massive stars. Cosmic dust is an important component of galaxies, stars, planets, and even life. Until recently, astronomers knew of only two places where dust formed: in the outflows of...

2006-02-07 17:15:00

Scientists have made the astonishing discovery that sound might drive supernovae explosions. Their computer simulations say that dying stars pulse at audible frequencies -- for instance, at about the F-note above middle C -- for a split second before they blow up. Researchers in the 1960s began using computer models to test ideas about what, exactly, causes stars to explode. But mathematical simulations have so far failed to satisfactorily explain the inner workings of nature's most...

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2005-09-23 07:08:47

Chandra -- Astronomers have found compelling evidence that a supernova shock wave has produced a large amount of cosmic rays, particles of mysterious origin that constantly bombard the Earth. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, supports theoretical arguments that shock waves from stellar explosions may be a primary source of cosmic rays. This finding is important for understanding the origin of cosmic rays, which are atomic nuclei that strike the Earth's atmosphere...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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