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Latest U.S. Army Corps of Engineers civil works controversies Stories

2010-05-19 09:51:00

KANSAS CITY, Mo., May 19 /PRNewswire/ -- While a new America THINKS survey from HNTB Corporation shows six in ten (60 percent) Americans believe their area is prepared to deal with the potential damage from an extreme storm, hurricane or extensive flooding, events this spring have shown otherwise. To view the multimedia assets associated with this release, please click http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/americans-too-confident-in-flood-hurricane-preparedness-94251249.html "Recent...

2010-01-22 17:51:00

WASHINGTON, Jan. 22 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy and Larry Selzer, president and CEO of The Conservation Fund, gathered today on the shores of the Anacostia River to sign a memorandum of understanding announcing a partnership that will promote enhanced conservation and balanced management of the nation's water resources and sustainable development in adjacent communities. "Today's ceremony builds on the U.S. Army Corps of...

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2009-11-19 13:35:00

A federal judge in New Orleans has ruled that negligence by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers led to massive floods in parts of New Orleans as Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, BBC News reported. Six complaints by residents and a business were upheld in court against the Corps over its maintenance of a navigational channel, which led to awarded damages totaling $720,000, and the ruling could lead to thousands more claims. Hurricane Katrina flooded around 80 percent of New Orleans causing more...

2009-05-13 17:47:00

Report finds significant improvements since Hurricane Katrina BOSTON, May 13 /PRNewswire/ -- GEI Consultants, Inc., a national water resources, geotechnical, environmental and ecological science and engineering firm, announced today that firm Principal R. Lee Wooten, P.E., a civil engineer with geotechnical concentration, recently co-lead a team of civil engineers to New Orleans, Louisiana to assess levee performance following Hurricane Gustav. Wooten was also the principal author of the...

2008-06-23 09:00:54

By Monica Davey The levees along the Mississippi River offer a patchwork of unpredictable protections. Some are tall and earthen, others aging and sandy, and many along its tributaries uncataloged by federal officials. The levees are owned and maintained by all sorts of towns, agencies, even individual farmers, making the work in Iowa, Illinois and Missouri last week of gaming the flood - calculating where water levels would exceed the capacity of the protective walls - especially...

2008-06-22 03:00:12

By Deb Gruver, The Wichita Eagle, Kan. Jun. 22--As Iowa and Illinois scurry to save homes and businesses from historic flooding, Wichita's public works director is warning that the Big Ditch was never meant to handle the kind of floods that have swamped parts of the Midwest. At stake is $6.7 billion in property in the area protected by the Big Ditch, roughly from I-235 to Hillside, as well as Haysville. The flood control project completed in 1959 for $20 million was designed to protect...

2006-08-25 13:15:00

NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - New Orleans needs a single person responsible for its levee system in order to avoid another Hurricane Katrina-style disaster, the American Society of Civil Engineers said on Friday. A report by the engineers also recommended that the U.S. Congress establish a system for nationwide levee maintenance, which would be similar to a U.S. system to keep dams safe. "Put someone in charge," the engineers said, adding that the levee system in New Orleans, built in pieces over...

2006-08-24 18:15:56

NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers pledged on Thursday to seek more outside review of its work and to better explain the risks and benefits of projects aimed at avoiding a repeat of the Hurricane Katrina tragedy. The Corps took responsibility in June for the failure of levees it built over a 40-year period in New Orleans, which led to the flooding of 80 percent of the city. About 1,500 people in four states were killed, according to the National Hurricane...

2006-08-10 21:16:07

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The head of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who in June admitted that design flaws in the levees his agency built to protect New Orleans caused most of the flooding during Hurricane Katrina, has asked to retire, the Army said on Thursday. In an after-hours announcement, the Army issued a statement saying Lt. Gen. Carl Strock, commander and chief engineer of the corps, had requested his retirement from the military "based on family and personal...

2006-06-19 12:20:26

By James Vicini WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A splintered U.S. Supreme Court failed on Monday to decide whether the federal government can regulate wetlands away from navigable waters in a case that provided the first indication of anti-environmentalist views by President George W. Bush's two appointees. By a 5-4 vote, the justices set aside a U.S. appeals court ruling that upheld the government's authority to regulate the specific wetlands at issue and sent both cases back for more...


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pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
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