Quantcast

Latest U.S. Forest Service Stories

2009-09-16 13:07:32

The U.S. Forest Service says computer models suggest tamarisk -- an aggressive invasive plant -- will likely expand its habitat if the climate changes. Scientists at the Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station say if projected warming trends are realized, one of the nation's most aggressive exotic plants will invade more U.S. land area. Results of our study suggest that a little over 20 percent of the Northwest east of the Cascade Mountains supports suitable tamarisk habitat, but...

2009-09-10 08:18:35

The U.S. Forest Service says it has determined the Pacific Northwest's dry years are becoming drier as a result of climate change. Forest Service researchers Charlie Luce and Z.A. Holden said most recent studies of annual streamflow in the Pacific Northwest have looked at mean or median streamflows and have found little or no change during recent decades. But Luce and Holden say it's important to know the severity of dry spells -- a subject that has not been studied as thoroughly. The...

2009-08-10 14:16:29

U.S. officials announced Monday at the 65th birthday of Smokey Bear in Washington that the anti-forest fire icon is going bilingual with a new book. The U.S. Forest Service said the fire prevention symbol will inform children in a book written in both English and Spanish on ways to prevent forest fires and wildfires, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported Monday. Smokey Bear is one of the most beloved symbols in American history, and his important message has been communicated to generations of...

2009-06-10 07:30:00

PSA Campaign Debut Coincides with National Get Outdoors Day NEW YORK, June 10 /PRNewswire/ -- Children in the U.S. spend fifty percent less time outdoors than they did twenty years ago, according to the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. To view the Multimedia News Release, go to: http://www.prnewswire.com/mnr/adcouncil/38724/ In an effort to encourage children and their parents to re-connect with nature, the U.S. Forest Service is joining the Ad Council today to...

2009-05-05 15:51:27

U.S. Forest Service scientists say they've completed a study of a beetle that has attacked 67 percent of the oak trees in an area 30 miles east of San Diego. The study focused on Agrilus coxalis, a wood-boring beetle that the scientists said is so rare it hasn't even been given an accepted common name. Scientists have proposed the insect be named the goldspotted oak borer. Land managers and scientists are concerned about the spread of the infestation because oaks are the dominant tree species...

2009-05-05 08:00:00

Serena Business Mashups Accelerate Audit Compliance and Automate Work Processes - Reduced 40 Hours of Manual Overhead to a Single Step! REDWOOD CITY, Calif., May 5 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Forest Service may have old roots dating back to 1876, but it had modern-day IT problems that needed immediate remedy. Lack of repeatable, auditable business processes exposed the organization to regulatory risks and inefficiencies that if left unchecked could result in political and budgetary...

a2f011ef5eb68d5f23106832a83f1c15
2009-05-03 12:24:15

U.S. Forest Service scientists have completed a study on a beetle that was first detected in California in 2004, but has now attacked 67 percent of the oak trees in an area 30 miles east of San Diego. Their report appears in the current issue of The Pan-Pacific Entomologist and focuses on Agrilus coxalis, a wood-boring beetle so rare it does not even have an accepted common name. Scientists have proposed the Entomological Society of America common names committee call it the goldspotted oak...

f9fb6dff0fe21ddaaf1be1bb2effa63c
2009-05-02 11:20:00

A fungus, which has reportedly already killed an estimated 500,000 bats, is causing the U.S. Forest Service to close thousands of caves and former mines in national forests in 33 states in an attempt to control the problem. The problem was first noticed in New York and after two years had spread to caves in both Virginia and West Virginia. 99% of the bats infected have died. While there is no reason to believe the fungus poses a threat to humans, bats have been dying at a startling rate from...

1f498d6a10f417a1ca8f4d0c1d402b7c1
2009-04-30 08:46:23

Study provides first evidence of connection between Rocky, Sierra Nevada Mountain populations A wolverine first photographed by a remote-controlled camera on the Tahoe National Forest in February 2008 is most closely related to Rocky Mountain populations, according to a team of 10 federal, state and university scientists. Their findings are published in the latest edition of Northwest Science and focus on genetic analysis of hair collected from the first scientifically verified California...

2009-03-27 11:27:55

The impact fish stocking has on aquatic insects in mountain lakes can be rapidly reversed by removing non-native trout, according to a study completed by U.S. Forest Service and University of California, Davis, scientists. Their findings appear in a current online issue of the journal Freshwater Biology where they describe experiments that examined some effects of fisheries management practices now in use in California mountain lakes where fish do not naturally occur. The research has value...


Latest U.S. Forest Service Reference Libraries

Fremont-Winema National Forest
2013-11-27 15:32:16

Fremont-Winema National Forest is a United States National Forest that was created from the 2002 merger of the Fremont and Winema National Forests. They cover territory in southern Oregon from the crest of the Cascades on the west, past the city of Lakeview towards the east. The northern end of the forest is bounded by U.S. Route 97 on the west, and Oregon Route 31 towards the east. Towards the south, the state border with California creates the boundary of the forests. Klamath Falls is the...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
Related