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2010-11-25 22:14:57

Clean energy investments in rural areas go hand-in-hand with alleviating poverty In the developing world, reducing greenhouse gas emissions is often seen as being in conflict with alleviating poverty, since improving the standard of living is usually associated with increased energy use. A clean energy development initiative in rural Nicaragua, however, demonstrates that there are cost effective steps developing nations can take to reduce carbon emissions and at the same time help the rural...

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2010-11-23 10:35:00

By Yasmin Anwar, UC Berkeley Questions and answers with UC Berkeley parenting guru Christine Carter Drawing from research and personal experience, Christine Carter "” a sociologist, happiness expert, and director of UC Berkeley's Greater Good Parents program "” shares insights on how practicing gratitude, not just at Thanksgiving but year-round, can make for happier families. Q. Aren't we born grateful? Why do kids need to learn this? A. No. Most of us are actually born feeling...

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2010-11-17 11:55:00

By Yasmin Anwar, UC Berkeley Apocalyptic warnings challenge beliefs that world is just and stable Dire or emotionally charged warnings about the consequences of global warming can backfire if presented too negatively, making people less amenable to reducing their carbon footprint, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. "Our study indicates that the potentially devastating consequences of global warming threaten people's fundamental tendency to see the world as...

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2010-11-10 09:06:24

By Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley University of California, Berkeley, scientists have found a way to overcome one of the main limitations of ultrasound imaging "“ the poor resolution of the picture. Everyone who has had an ultrasound, including most pregnant women, is familiar with the impressionistic nature of the images. One of the limits to the detail obtainable with sonography is the frequency of the sound. The basic laws of physics dictate that the smallest objects you can "see" are...

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2010-11-04 09:15:12

Black holes could produce the enormous energies of a burst, but not neutron stars A gamma-ray burst is an immensely powerful blast of high-energy light thought to be generated by a collapsing star in a distant galaxy, but what this collapse leaves behind has been a matter of debate. A new analysis of four extremely bright bursts observed by NASA's Fermi satellite suggests that the remnant from a long-duration gamma-ray burst is most likely a black hole "“ not a rapidly spinning, highly...

2010-09-28 13:07:01

Each time we perform a simple task, like pushing an elevator button or reaching for a cup of coffee, the brain races to decide whether the left or right hand will do the job. But the left hand is more likely to win if a certain region of the brain receives magnetic stimulation, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. UC Berkeley researchers applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the posterior parietal cortex region of the brain in 33 right-handed...

2010-09-20 22:38:44

The world's largest applied mathematics society, the International Council for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM), has awarded two of its five quadrennial prizes to two University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) mathematicians. Alexandre J. Chorin, University Professor of Mathematics and a senior scientist in LBNL's Mathematics Group, will be honored with the 2011 Lagrange Prize, established "to provide international recognition to individual...

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2010-08-26 07:57:40

New seismic technique detects boundary between old and new lithosphere The North American continent is not one thick, rigid slab, but a layer cake of ancient, 3 billion-year-old rock on top of much newer material probably less than 1 billion years old, according to a new study by seismologists at the University of California, Berkeley. The finding, which is reported in the Aug. 26 issue of Nature, explains inconsistencies arising from new seismic techniques being used to explore the interior...

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2010-08-26 07:50:00

The asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter is often depicted as a dull zone of dead rocks with an occasional wayward speedster smashing through on its way toward the sun. A new study appearing in the Aug. 26 issue of the journal Nature paints a different picture, one of slow but steady change, where sunlight gradually drives asteroids to split in two and move far apart to become independent asteroids among the millions orbiting the sun. "This shows that asteroids are not inert, dead bodies...

2010-08-19 15:19:45

Children who were exposed to organophosphate pesticides while still in their mother's womb were more likely to develop attention disorders years later, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. The new findings, to be published Aug. 19 in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP), are the first to examine the influence of prenatal organophosphate exposure on the later development of attention problems. The researchers found that prenatal...


Latest UC Berkeley Reference Libraries

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2009-07-14 16:50:21

Einsteinium is a metallic synthetic element with the symbol Es and atomic number 99. It became the seventh transuranic (atomic number higher than 99) element produced. It was named for Albert Einstein. It is an element found within the actinoid series which includes Actinium. Though it has only been produced in small amounts, it has been accurately determined to be silver in coloration. Like all synthetic elements, einsteinium isotopes are highly radioactive and are extremely toxic. Besides...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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