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Latest UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering Stories

Inspecting Power Lines Made Simpler And Less Expensive With SkySweeper Robot
2013-08-06 14:32:28

UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering [ Watch The Video - Researchers Develop Robot For Safer Power Line Maintenance ] Mechanical engineers at the University of California, San Diego invented a robot designed to scoot along utility lines, searching for damage and other problems that require repairs. Made of off-the-shelf electronics and plastic parts printed on an inexpensive 3D printer, the SkySweeper prototype could be scaled up for less than $1,000, making it significantly more...

Nanotrees Harvest Sun's Energy, Turn Water Into Hydrogen Fuel
2012-03-08 04:51:22

Researchers focused on artificial photosynthesis University of California, San Diego electrical engineers are building a forest of tiny nanowire trees in order to cleanly capture solar energy without using fossil fuels and harvest it for hydrogen fuel generation. Reporting in the journal Nanoscale, the team said nanowires, which are made from abundant natural materials like silicon and zinc oxide, also offer a cheap way to deliver hydrogen fuel on a mass scale. "This is a clean way to...

Smart, Self-healing Hydrogels Have Possibilities In Medicine, Engineering
2012-03-06 04:22:48

[ Watch the Video ] University of California, San Diego bioengineers have developed a self-healing hydrogel that binds in seconds, as easily as Velcro, and forms a bond strong enough to withstand repeated stretching. The material has numerous potential applications, including medical sutures, targeted drug delivery, industrial sealants and self-healing plastics, a team of UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering researchers reported March 5 in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings...

Electrical Engineers Build 'No-waste' Laser
2012-02-09 05:12:54

Team makes startling discovery in highly efficient, 'thresholdless' laser A team of University of California, San Diego researchers has built the smallest room-temperature nanolaser to date, as well as an even more startling device: a highly efficient, "thresholdless" laser that funnels all its photons into lasing, without any waste. The two new lasers require very low power to operate, an important breakthrough since lasers usually require greater and greater "pump power" to begin...

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2011-07-19 09:15:05

Those solar panels on top of your roof aren't just providing clean power; they are cooling your house, or your workplace, too, according to a team of researchers led by Jan Kleissl, a professor of environmental engineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. In a study in an upcoming issue of the journal Solar Energy, Kleissl and his team published what they believe are the first peer-reviewed measurements of the cooling benefits provided by solar photovoltaic panels. Using...

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2011-05-27 10:37:49

A new biomaterial designed for repairing damaged human tissue doesn't wrinkle up when it is stretched. The invention from nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego marks a significant breakthrough in tissue engineering because it more closely mimics the properties of native human tissue. Shaochen Chen, professor in the Department of NanoEngineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, hopes future tissue patches, which are used to repair damaged heart walls, blood...

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2010-11-26 09:15:31

University of California - San Diego electrical engineers developed ultra compact, low power pulse compressor on a silicon chip Electrical engineers generated short, powerful light pulses on a chip "“ an important step toward the optical interconnects that will likely replace the copper wires that carry information between chips within today's computers. University of California, San Diego electrical engineers recently developed the first ultra compact, low power pulse compressor on a...

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2010-04-15 08:00:00

A natural product found in both coconut oil and human breast milk "“ lauric acid -- shines as a possible new acne treatment thanks to a bioengineering graduate student from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. The student developed a "smart delivery system" "“ published in the journal ACS Nano in March "“ capable of delivering lauric-acid-filled nano-scale bombs directly to skin-dwelling bacteria (Propionibacterium acnes) that cause common acne. On Thursday April...

2009-12-09 10:21:47

Bioengineers from University of California, San Diego are developing new regenerative therapies for heart disease that could influence the way in which regenerative therapies for cardiovascular and other diseases are treated in the future. New results from UC San Diego on using adult stem cells to regenerate heart tissue in environments that mimic a human post-heart-attack heart were presented this week in San Diego at the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)....

2009-07-31 14:13:41

A group of nanoengineers, biologists and physicists have used innovative approaches to deduce the internal structure of chromatin, a key player in DNA regulation, to reconcile a longstanding controversy in this field. This new finding could unlock the mystery behind the origin of many diseases such as cancer. The details of this breakthrough discovery are highlighted in a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) called "Evidence for heteromorphic chromatin fibers...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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